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the horror genre and contemporary Spanish cinema
Andrew Willis

part of this aim, renaming it The Bronston Studios. Due to the politics of the time it is unlikely that this could have happened without the support of key elements in the Franco regime. As Peter Besas has observed, The government was delighted to see the American building a miniature Hollywood in Madrid, providing employment

in Contemporary Spanish cinema and genre
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Tom Whittaker

accommodate this rapid influx of migrants, many of them had no other choice than to live in shanty towns and illegal settlements on the edges of the city, areas of social exclusion that became breeding grounds for petty crime. Attempts by the Franco regime at mitigating the burgeoning housing crisis frequently made matters worse. In a phenomenon known as ‘chabolismo vertical’ (vertical shanty towns), migrants were rehoused in Unidades Vecinales de Absorción (UVAs), multi-storey tower blocks that were as poorly constructed as they were densely stacked. Too often

in The Spanish quinqui film
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Through feminine eyes
Parvati Nair and Julián Daniel Gutiérrez-Albilla

totalitarian regimes and repressive military dictatorships. Although it is important to emphasise that these repressive military regimes, such as the Franco regime, changed dramatically over their years of rule, under totalitarian regimes or military dictatorships almost no single physical or symbolic space can escape their omnipotence. For instance, right until the death of Franco in 1975, one could neither criticise the Catholic

in Hispanic and Lusophone women filmmakers
Carmen Ciller

schools in Spain 115 the sensual foreigner, which was so popular in the Spanish films of the Franco regime, is expanded here, and confirmed when Mario explains to Pepe that Barbara ‘en la cama funciona estupendamente’ [she works perfectly under the sheets], as if to explain why he still loves her despite her being so extravagant. It must be remarked that Barbara speaks with an accent that is clearly foreign. Everything in Barbara is presented as different to the traditions Spaniards are used to, including the fact that she has her own business and does not need her

in Performance and Spanish film
Sarah Wright

celebration of child death. In this film, the death of a child is not purported to be the tragedy that is feared by the parents of the sick girl in the story that frames the narrative proper, but rather, ‘a triumphant experience for the individual and an affirmation for the community’ (Avery and Reynolds, 2000: 7). Marcelino’s miraculous tale survives through the generations, drawing the community together (even if, as the narrator informs us, the locals have forgotten the reason for their festivities). The Franco regime loved to institute commemorations, as ‘a way to

in The child in Spanish cinema
Tom Whittaker

1980 and released in Spain in May 1981, Deprisa, deprisa signalled both a rupture from Carlos Saura's filmmaking of the 1960s and 1970s, which was known for its metaphorical critiques of the Franco regime, as well as a return to the theme of delinquency of his cinematic debut Los golfos (1960). The film was a co-production between his regular producer Elías Querejeta Producciones and the French production company Films Molière (with the latter also having co-production credits on his more recent films Los ojos vendados/Blindfolded Eyes (1976) and Mamá cumple

in The Spanish quinqui film
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Embodiment and adolescence in recent Spanish films
Sarah Wright

’s 1963 experimental Se necesita chico (Boy Wanted) used the sounds of jazz to recreate a child’s world in 1960s Spain.8 But if Se necesita chico seems like experimentation with film form and the child’s experience for its own sake, in Del rosa al amarillo the child’s world is drawn for us to reveal the ideologies fed to children during the Franco regime. The film makes use of various intertexts from the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s such as the imagery of the religious Crusade and patriotic fervour of the comic Guerrero del Antifaz which Guillermo uses to punctuate his

in The child in Spanish cinema
Historical cinema in post-Franco Spain
Barry Jordan and Rikki Morgan-Tamosunas

and 1990s there has been a significant output of both popular movies and less accessible arthouse films which self-consciously reflect on a whole range of relationships between the past and the present, reality and representation, history and memory. History, cinema and the mitologia franquista The ideological agenda of the Franco regime was

in Contemporary Spanish cinema
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Basque cinema, gender and the home(land)
Ann Davies

1950s of a member of the Basque government in exile during the Franco regime. She also contributed a short piece, ‘Madrid mon amour’ to the portmanteau film Hay motivo ( There’s a Reason , 2004) that compiled the reactions of different Spanish directors to the policies of Spain’s ruling party of the time, the Partido Popular. Her most recent film was Paisito ( Small Country ) in 2008

in Hispanic and Lusophone women filmmakers
Popular genre film in post-Franco Spain
Barry Jordan and Rikki Morgan-Tamosunas

, ‘subgeneneric’ movies of the Franco years (Morgan and Jordan 1994 : 57–8). However, apart from being very popular, comedy also afforded (limited) opportunities for social commentary and critical reflection, as seen in Berlanga’s now legendary satire of Francoist mythology in Bienvenido, Mr Marshall (1952). Thus, where the Franco regime appropriated popular film as a vehicle for its retrograde values

in Contemporary Spanish cinema