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Popular culture and (non-Whedon) authorship
Matthew Pateman

. Whedon's worlds are many things, but all of them are celebrations of popular culture in its many guises. Most notably, each of his major shows exists as a hybrid concoction of a range of popular genres (gothic, noir, sitcom and so on). In their very form, then, Whedon creates shows that are quintessentially located in popular culture. But while this may be true at a general level, it is also the case

in Joss Whedon
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David Annwn Jones

of portrayals of isolated ruins still elicited potent and multifarious responses from the observer. These, after all, were the deepest spiritual responses of humans’ inner being – a confrontation with the mysteries of mortality. After the Second World War, the ruins of Vienna served to symbolise the destruction of a city and old friendship caused by greed in Carol Reed’s work of Gothic Noir: The

in Gothic effigy
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David Annwn Jones

Hitchcock’s Rebecca (1940) was perhaps the most notable and earliest example of Gothic Noir, Roger Corman’s cycle of Poe adaptations (1959–64) returned to explore the nineteenth century, whilst Michael Reeves’s Witchfinder General (1968) and its spin-offs like Piers Haggard’s Blood on Satan’s Claw (1970) explored earlier encounters with evil. Tony Scott’s The Hunger

in Gothic effigy