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Lee’s Kruitzner and Byron’s Werner
Robert Miles

shift in the deep structure of the self, or in the culture that may, or may not, have produced it. But I do contend that a project such as this one – intent on catching the discursive inflections of Gothic writing in its inter textual moments – provides a basis, an understanding, on which it is possible to proceed. I argued that the discursive provenance of the Gothic – the Gothic aesthetic and hygienic

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
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The dance of global darkness
Steven Bruhm

becoming a borderless art for a borderless century’ ( 2010 : 1). This chapter seeks to unpack a number of suggestions and assumptions that I have woven into my above description of butoh as a recognisably gothic aesthetic. By juxtaposing the living dead of an ‘Eastern’ dance practice with the animated corpse of the ‘Western’ gothic, I want to join two critical traditions that, to my knowledge, have not yet

in Globalgothic
Robert Miles

and its shadow are not of a universal, remote character, but invoke power. The desire aroused by the Gothic garden (sexual desire but also desire for self-realization) is one crossed by discourse. In assessing Gothic narratives of nurture it is important once again to keep gender in mind. In discussing the Gothic aesthetic I argued that the discursive values of the Gothic (patriarchy, the companionate

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
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Gender in the Gothic
Robert Miles

In the last chapter we looked at the Gothic as discourse, as a site of power/knowledge. Insofar as the Gothic aesthetic incorporates an idealized national identity together with a myth of origin it tends towards the openly ideological. But power is also written into the Gothic in less explicit ways. I used Foucault to problematize the late eighteenth century as a period of ‘archival

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
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Gardens, religious tradition and ecoGothic exegesis in Algernon Blackwood’s ‘The Lost Valley’ and ‘The Transfer’
Christopher M. Scott

employing the Gothic aesthetic in his narratives, Blackwood prefers instead to implement it in the light of his own interpretation of spiritual and ecological ontologies. Blackwood's nuanced presentation of the Gothic aesthetic cultivates an ecoGothic parterre within which Blackwood's physical landscapes evoke dread through a mystical conflation of gardens and the otherworldly. Blackwoodian mystical landscapes When he observed the natural landscape, Blackwood viewed it beyond its mere exterior characteristics. He recognised the

in EcoGothic gardens in the long nineteenth century
‘Mariana’, Maud and Somersby
Sue Edney

words ‘fall into a configuration’ (55) with Mariana's largely self-imposed state of physical and emotional immobility, and also with the picturesque Gothic aesthetic that allows for fantastic conjurations. Measure for Measure creates more problems here than it solves: Mariana does, eventually, marry Angelo who had rejected her for so many years, but under such strange circumstances that one might expect her to refuse. However, John Stuart Mill considers the Shakespearean relevance to be nominal; we should only ‘retain’ the moated grange ‘and a solitary dweller

in EcoGothic gardens in the long nineteenth century
Hammer Film Studios’ reinvention of horror cinema
Morgan C. O’Brien

auteur status while aligning the studio itself with the American studio era. Pirie saw Hammer operating as a ‘mini-major’ in a dilution of the early Hollywood mode of production ( A Heritage of Horror 43). The auteur theory was still being codified in the 1970s, and, seeing critically derided director Terence Fisher as the hand that shaped Hammer’s Gothic aesthetic, Pirie was keen to be the first to resituate Fisher as an artist (Ibid. 49, 52). To assert Fisher’s status, Pirie used the incipient auteur theories of Andrew Sarris and Peter Wollen, utilising their tenets

in Adapting Frankenstein
Robert Miles

’ controversy, Shakespeare contra Voltaire, the new aesthetic emerging from the canonization of the national poet versus French neo-classicism. In one respect Walpole’s celebrated comments in the second preface, on his attempts to forge ‘modern’ romance, are merely an intervention in the arguments producing the Gothic aesthetic. But in another they enlarge the boundaries of contemporary controversy. A link

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
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What is 'Gothic'?
Robert Miles

. The first, in explicating genealogy, uses the theories of Michel Foucault and Lawrence Stone to problematize the late eighteenth century, as a means of gaining a focus on the kind, and character, of the discourses relevant to the Gothics provenance. The next box, on the Gothic aesthetic, closes on the construction of the Gothic as a taste, an ideology, a series of related discourses at the back of Gothic writing. The next

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
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Andrew Smith

states of feeling (such as grief and melancholy) and the rhetorical construction of emotion in an emerging Gothic aesthetic. The Romantic Gothic explores the role of the writer in this Gothic discourse about death that, in its establishment of a Gothic iconography, also reaches out to an implied reader who can interpret the type of codes and symbols that characterise this discourse. The dead also occupy

in Gothic death 1740–1914