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Wendy R. Childs
and
Phillipp R. Schofield

the Jews, and then the disciple, stripped of the kingdom of the English. (d) Higden Polychronicon , VIII, pp. 298–300 This passage was copied by the canon of Bridlington (p. 91) with minor changes, noted here. This Edward was a fine figure of a man, outstanding in strength, but very unreliable in his way of life, so it is

in The reign of Edward II, 1307–27
Jews as Europeans in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries
John Edwards

The Jewish contribution to European history Most of world history until the later eighteenth century could be written without more than marginal references to the Jews, except as a small people which pioneered the monotheistic world religions, a debt acknowledged by Islam, but

in The Jews in western Europe 1400–1600
C. E. Beneš

that Rome was built in the time of Ahaz, king of the Jews. 5 When we add these dates together, we find in the chronicles that 807 years passed from Moses to Ahaz. 6 Therefore if Janus reigned at the time of Moses, as the chronicles say, and he founded Janicula, as Solinus says, and Rome was built at the time of Ahaz, king of the Jews, as the chronicles say, we will find that Genoa was

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

once had a very high tree prepared so that he could have the Jew Mordecai hanged from it, and he persuaded King Ahasuerus that it was appropriate to punish and hang the said Mordecai as a criminal. But when the king had examined the matter he found Mordecai innocent and praiseworthy; furthermore, he found Haman to be a criminal deserving of punishment, so he had Haman hanged from the same tree that Haman had prepared for Mordecai. As Solomon

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

, as is evident from the book of the Acts of the Apostles which explains that there were two sects among the Jews: the Pharisees, who acknowledged the resurrection, and the Sadducees, who denied the resurrection. 21 And although these two were divided on that matter, they were nonetheless united in their persecution of Paul. So together they captured Paul, intending to kill him. But Paul worked to incite quarrels

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Thus the Greeks besieged Troy, a most famous and powerful city, with a strong army, and they captured the besieged city, and utterly destroyed the captured city. For this reason, because of the glory of this victory, the Greeks took to counting their years from the capture of Troy. Just as the Jews count their years from the liberation out of Egypt or the handing down of the law; the Romans count from the foundation of the City [i.e. Rome]; and

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Great], a man learned in every science, transferred it to Paris where it flourishes even today. 65 Around this same time in Syria the Jews pierced a certain image of Christ in its side with a lance, and from this wound blood gushed most copiously. Accordingly the stupefied Jews held a bowl underneath it which was immediately filled with this blood. The blood was dispersed and divided among

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

Jews for your sake, and of the resurrection. At Terce, prepare your heart for true penitence and the taking of [the?] discipline, and think of Christ’s scourging and the sending of the Holy Spirit. At Sext, think how man was made from dust and ashes etc., and [yet] as regards your soul you were made in the image and likeness of God, and of the incarnation of Christ and his crucifixion. At None, of your last hour and the death of

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

the world, because great shame and confusion devolve upon a woman who is caught in adultery. As Solomon says, a diligent woman is a crown to her husband , but she who does things worthy of disgrace is like decay in his bones . 21 The fourth is fear of the public laws, which condemn adulterous wives. Thus the Jews said to Christ, ‘Master , here is a woman recently discovered in

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

unique and yet absolutely characteristic, were the Jews [ 41 ], [ 42 ]. Following the Norman Conquest, Jewish settlers scattered themselves through sixty English towns. 7 The fiscal interest of the crown led to these being formed into official communities, but these were not ghettos, and Jewish families lived in the same streets as Christians. In the twelfth century the area of London known as ‘the

in Towns in medieval England