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Cathedral promotes itself as a secular venue, available for hire (be it corporate entertainment, conferences, or concerts). As a concert hall, it is kept very busy, and provides a diverse programme of classical music, given by professional orchestras and student ensembles from Chetham’s and the Royal Northern College of Music, and more popular styles. This ‘wider musical life of the Cathedral’ is one of the key aspects of the Manchester Cathedral Development Project, which aims to renew the heart of Manchester and Salford

in Manchester Cathedral
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the Sainte Chapelle in Paris. 12 This intertwining of political aspirations with religious devotion has been described as a new kind of ‘political theology’, in part intended to portray the king as miles Christi (soldier of Christ). 13 Bishops organized a national effort of prayers and processions and parish congregations became intercessors for those fighting overseas. Five centuries later, weekly prayers in Manchester Cathedral during the Second World War would echo this founding principle. 14 Henry V

in Manchester Cathedral
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. Raines, The Fellows of the Collegiate Church of Manchester , edited by F. Renaud, 2 vols, CS ns 21, 23 (Manchester: Chetham Society, 1891). Raines was an assiduous collector, but his judgement is not to be relied upon, so these volumes must be used with care. 12 Christopher Hunwick, ‘Manchester Cathedral Archives’, Lancashire Local Historian 19 (2006), pp. 1–12. 13 Manchester, MCA, Mancath/2/2/1; Mancath 2/A/1a/1. 14

in Manchester Cathedral
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Until 1828–29, the special position of the Established Church in relation to the state was still intact in legal terms both at the national and local level. The clergy of the Collegiate Church of Manchester and their lay officials still appeared to be the chief ecclesiastical authority in the town. They also frequently took the lead in local affairs. The clergy moved from their suspect Tory Jacobite associations of the earlier eighteenth century to the uncompromising loyalism of the 1790s onwards. This strengthened the alliance of Church and State, and in the 1790s ‘Church and King’ became a potent war-cry for suppressing political reformers and smearing Dissenting associations. But the Church’s control in Manchester was not absolute. The demise of Church and King mobs, the growth of non-Anglican churches, congregations and schools and of absenteeism from Church tell their own tale, as do the voices of critics, the failure of Sabbath discipline, and the increasing recourse to voluntary persuasion. The cracks in the ruling edifice were deepened by the reaction against Peterloo. The erosion of Establishment begun with the emancipation of Dissenters and Roman Catholics in 1828–29 continued during the following decades.

in Manchester Cathedral
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Clare Hartwell

Manchester: Something rich and strange Stained glass – Clare Hartwell Like almost all medieval churches of any size, Manchester Cathedral was once filled with stained glass, but little is known of it, apart from tantalising descriptions and a few fragments taken elsewhere.4 What survived into the twentieth century, including Victorian as well as ancient glass, was finished off by the Manchester Blitz. The cathedral went on to acquire the major examples of twentieth-century glass which are considered here. Stained and painted glass was and remains a major strand

in Manchester
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Clare Hartwell

historic identity. Despite the losses, remarkable fifteenth-century structures do survive in the city centre: Manchester Cathedral and the old buildings of Chetham’s School and Library, originally the lodgings of priests. Recreation of the medieval past is traceable in both buildings, in the historicising repairs and reinstatement of lost medieval form, although both incorporate substantial original work. The nave (western part) of the cathedral was largely rebuilt during the nineteenth century, most comprehensively by the architect Joseph Crowther. It had been found (by

in Manchester
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Something rich and strange

Manchester: Something rich and strange challenges us to see the quintessential post-industrial city in new ways. Bringing together twenty-three diverse writers and a wide range of photographs of Greater Manchester, it argues that how we see the city can have a powerful effect on its future – an urgent question given how quickly the urban core is being transformed. The book uses sixty different words to speak about the diversity of what we think of as Manchester – whether the chimneys of its old mills, the cobbles mostly hidden under the tarmac, the passages between terraces, or the everyday act of washing clothes in a laundrette. Unashamedly down to earth in its focus, this book makes the case for a renewed imaginative relationship that recognises and champions the fact that we’re all active in the making and unmaking of urban spaces.

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Martin Dodge

, and point up the contrast between the sterile corporate feel of the Arndale and the more creative and quirky ambiance of the Northern Quarter area lying just beyond its Withy Grove boundary. Yet the Manchester Arndale remains full, with big-name retail brands and busy with shoppers of all ages. 68 19  Fire Window, Manchester Cathedral, designed by Margaret Traherne and installed in 1966

in Manchester
Space, power and governance in mid-twentieth century British cities

Reconstructing modernity assesses the character of approaches to rebuilding British cities during the decades after the Second World War. It explores the strategies of spatial governance that sought to restructure society and looks at the cast of characters who shaped these processes. It challenges traditional views of urban modernism as moderate and humanist, shedding new light on the importance of the immediate post-war for the trajectory of urban renewal in the twentieth century. The book shows how local corporations and town planners in Manchester and Hull attempted to create order and functionality through the remaking of their decrepit Victorian cities. It looks at the motivations of national and local governments in the post-war rebuilding process and explores why and how they attempted the schemes they did. What emerges is a picture of local corporations, planners and city engineers as radical reshapers of the urban environment, not through the production of grand examples of architectural modernism, but in mundane attempts to zone cities, produce greener housing estates, control advertising or regulate air quality. Their ambition to control and shape the space of their cities was an attempt to produce urban environments that might be both more orderly and functional, but also held the potential to shape society.

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Alan Kidd
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Melanie Tebbutt

clergyman, Mike’s early social life had revolved round the church and it is not surprising that when he and Christine first moved to Manchester they got involved in church affairs. She was employed as a nurse at the Manchester Royal Infirmary, and since neither knew Manchester well the church network provided a good way to get to know their adopted city and its people. In the early days they attended services at Manchester Cathedral, where their second son was christened. Given Mike’s propensity for involvement in community matters it is perhaps no surprise that for a

in People, places and identities