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Open Access (free)
A Belated but Welcome Theory of Change on Mental Health and Development
Laura Davidson

). Guardian ( 2018 ), ‘ #MeToo Strikes Aid Sector as Sexual Exploitation Allegations Proliferate ’, 12 February, by P. Beaumont and R. Radcliffe , www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/feb/12/metoo-strikes-aid-sector-as-sexual-exploitation-allegations-proliferate (accessed 4 January 2021

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

supposed to be saving, as we have seen with recent #MeToo scandals ( BBC, 2018a ). Also, their commitment to aid might be superficial and based around a narrow idea of life as basic subsistence, for example, rather than of the quality of the lives of those they have saved. But few modern humanitarians are likely to make a moral claim that they will save only the lives of those who look or think like them, a common occurrence in the nineteenth century. All beneficiaries have prima facie equal value. But humanitarians’ reliance on liberal world

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
‘When will the state be #MeToo’d?’
Jyotsna Siddharth

The discourse on #MeToo in India changed a few things. It gave upper-caste, upper-class, cis women in India a moment to express their agency to bring public attention to their sexual offender. It created, for them, a space to publicly express their anger offering a moment of celebration for the contemporary feminist movement. This moment may be seen to have brought some respite to this subset of women who experienced sexual harassment and violation. One might argue that this moment was useful but partial

in Intimacy and injury
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Beyond the media storm – on sexual harassment in the news and the newsrooms
Nithila Kanagasabai

Tejpal – including his apology emails in which he admitted to non-consensual conduct towards the survivor – he was acquitted of all charges. The survivor, on the other hand, was discredited, with her sexual history being invoked (though such a move is deemed to be unlawful according to Indian law), and accused of not doing enough to protect herself and of not looking sufficiently traumatised after the event. Coming more than nearly two years after #MeToo went viral in October 2018, a year after the news of Hollywood

in Intimacy and injury
Rupali Bansode

sidelined, erased or concealed. This erasure, sidelining or concealment of Dalit women’s experiences of sexual violence is, at times, intentional and, at others, not. Further, the chapter discusses how India’s #MeToo movement, although initiated by the Dalit-Bahujan feminists, also remains limited in engaging with the phenomenon of caste-based sexual violence. The chapter is divided into four sections. The first details the caste atrocity committed against Satyabhama. The second discusses Dalit women’s position in

in Intimacy and injury
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Intimacy, injury and #MeToo in India and South Africa
Nicky Falkof, Shilpa Phadke, and Srila Roy

In a short period of time, we have witnessed both the seismic effects of the #MeToo movement and its ageing. We have felt the optimism that gathered as the hashtag travelled, while being sceptical about this particular wave of ‘clicktivism’. Even as we saw how an individualised ‘me’ gathered and mobilised an ever-widening ‘too’ – exemplifying how a hashtag amalgamates individual experiences into a story of systemic harm and mobilises collective solidarity (Clark-Parsons, 2019 ) – worries accumulated. For

in Intimacy and injury
Understanding changes in the legal landscape of sexual harassment in India
Rukmini Sen

Introduction: pre- and post-#MeToo in feminist politics? While there have been multiple ways in which feminist politics is experienced and transacted in the Indian context, #MeToo has undoubtedly transformed both the language and the practice of feminism. This chapter argues that the #MeToo moment in India became an important turning point for how the Indian women’s movement engaged with legal processes. Rupan Deol Bajaj was the first woman in Indian legal history to secure a conviction against her

in Intimacy and injury
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Performing refusal in four acts
Swati Arora

I don’t want to die With my hands up or legs open. (Putuma, 2017 ) I write this on the winter solstice of 2019, as the darkness in the northern hemisphere slowly begins to recede, amidst an overwhelming feeling of rage and despair. The world is either burning or in mourning, trying to latch on to the last flicker of hope for the new decade. The season of discontent that began with #MeToo highlighted the widespread

in Intimacy and injury
Configurations of con/destructive affective activism in women’s organising
Peace Kiguwa

, I make an argument for a more concentrated look at the place of emotions to show how social movements take on a life of their own and achieve multiple and often unforeseen effects that attest to their unpredictability. This argument rests on a view of emotions as more than just interior life, which engages emotions as never residing inside or outside of bodies but rather circulating within an assemblage that includes human and non-human actors. In South Africa, activism around #MeToo has intersected with

in Intimacy and injury
Alison Phipps

. Brett Kavanaugh was eventually confirmed as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, after a perfunctory delay. But Christine Blasey Ford’s actions inspired an international wave of support. The hashtag #WhyIDidntReport trended on social media. Tarana Burke and other leaders of #MeToo published an open letter of solidarity, and another one was signed by more than 200 alumnae of Ford’s high school. Ford was nominated for the John F. Kennedy 13 PHIPPS 9781526147172 PRINT.indd 13 14/01/2020 13:18 Me, not you Profile in Courage Award, named ‘person of the year’ by

in Me, not you