Search results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 268 items for :

  • "Samuel Beckett" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Daniela Caselli

of texts by both Beckett and Dante that intertexts in Beckett productively question ideas of origin, stability, and repetition. Finally, it will contend that the outcome of these practices is ‘Mr Beckett’ himself, the author with ‘the bay about his brow’. Notes 1 Sighle Kennedy, ‘Beckett’s schoolboy copy of Dante: a handbook for liberty’, Dalhousie French Studies , 19 (Fall Winter 1990), 11–19, 11. Kennedy quotes Mel Gussow, ‘Interview with Samuel Beckett’, The New York Times (31 December

in Beckett’s Dantes
Open Access (free)
The no-thing that knows no name and the Beckett envelope, blissfully reconsidered
Enoch Brater

cautiously in his introduction, ‘are therefore intended to be more suggestive than definitive’.2 My own contribution to the volume was a short piece that served, as this one does, as the final entry but not the final word on an intellectual dilemma that was at best both playful and profound. ‘The empty can: Samuel Beckett and Andy Warhol’, composed soon after completing my Ph.D. during the time when I was still trying to figure out how not to write about this most formidable of Irish playwrights, ended, pace Cleanth Brooks,3 like this: The well-wrought urn may have indeed

in Beckett and nothing
Abstract only
György Kurtág’s Samuel Beckett - Fin de partie, scènes et monologues
Olga Beloborodova

. 1 The present chapter is not an addition to the already copious literature on the subject of Beckett and music. Instead, I will examine György Kurtág's 2018 opera Samuel Beckett: Fin de partie, scènes et monologues as a particularly interesting case study to delve into the broader issues of the relationship between the original and the adaptation. To investigate this general issue, I will zoom in on Kurtág's intention to remain faithful to the text as much as possible, despite the obvious need to

in Beckett’s afterlives
Abstract only
Famine and the Western Front in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot
Matthew Schultz

Conclusion: Famine and the Western Front in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot Throughout this book I’ve traced the common employment of what I have identified as spectral tropes through nearly a dozen works of contemporary Irish fiction, from James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake (1939) to Anna Burns’s No Bones (2002). In novel after novel, we’ve witnessed how twentieth-century Irish authors have called upon Ireland’s historical ghosts to establish Irish history and national identity as more complex and convoluted than popular conceptions of Ireland’s historical

in Haunted historiographies
Open Access (free)
John Robert Keller

Introduction For the listener, who listens in the snow, And, nothing himself, beholds, Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is. Wallace Stevens Till feeling the need for company again he tells himself to call the hearer M at least. (Samuel Beckett) It is often said that the opening words of the psychoanalytical session contain the totality of what is to come. Thinking this true of the scholarly text, I find myself writing that this study is primarily about love. This might seem somewhat odd for a reading of Beckett, but I hope that in what follows the

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
Catherine Laws

insistent, if shadowy, presence of unheard sound. Beckett seems here to focus not on silence or absent sound but on a kind of leastness of sound; the traces of sound that emerge when listening can come and go (as in Stirrings Still (1983–87), when ‘in the end he ceased if not to hear to listen’),49 or perhaps an ideal and probably unattainable kind of hearing that is released from the anguish of self-perception. Beckett and unheard sound 189 Notes 1 John Gruen, ‘Samuel Beckett talks about Beckett’, Vogue, 127:2 (February 1970), 108. 2 Mary Bryden, ‘Beckett and the

in Beckett and nothing
Open Access (free)
Beckett and nothing: trying to understand Beckett
Daniela Caselli

Introduction Beckett and nothing: trying to understand Beckett Daniela Caselli Best worse no farther. Nohow less. Nohow worse. Nohow naught. Nohow on. Said nohow on. (Samuel Beckett, Worstward Ho) In unending ending or beginning light. Bedrock underfoot. So no sign of remains a sign that none before. No one ever before so – (Samuel Beckett, The Way)1 What not On 21 April 1958 Samuel Beckett writes to Thomas MacGreevy about having written a short stage dialogue to accompany the London production of Endgame.2 A fragment of a dramatic dialogue, paradoxically

in Beckett and nothing
Derval Tubridy

, creating a sculpture that has much in common 144 Beckett and nothing with the negative spaces of Beckett’s theatre. The American composer Morton Feldman’s Neither has been called an ‘anti-opera’, a stripped down, minimalist monodrama. Described as ‘shockingly beautiful as it is disorienting and distancing’ the music of Neither echoes the movement of Beckett’s text in an oscillation between two poles of impossibility.6 Samuel Beckett’s brief and evocative text was written for Morton Feldman in a collaboration initiated by Feldman. Commissioned by the Teatro dell

in Beckett and nothing
Abstract only
Jonathan Bignell

This book primarily addresses Samuel Beckett’s television dramas broadcast in Britain, from Eh Joe in 1966 to Quad in 1982. The broadcasting of Beckett’s theatre work on British television has a long history that runs parallel to his writing specifically for the television medium. For this reason the book includes comparative discussion of some broadcasts of television adaptations of theatre plays written by Beckett, including the Beckett on Film series of adaptations of each of his theatre plays, which were made for Channel 4 and

in Beckett on screen
Open Access (free)
Going on without in Beckett
John Pilling

1 On not being there: going on without in Beckett John Pilling ‘The essential is never to arrive anywhere, never to be anywhere . . .’ (Samuel Beckett, The Unnamable)1 Not much in Beckett is left wholly unaffected by the notion of ‘not being there’, even though he remains haunted by the self-imposed imperatives of ‘going on’. Not being there is only one of ‘the problems that beset continuance’ of which Beckett spoke in connection with the art and craft of his Israeli friend Avigdor Arikha, to which there can only ever be temporary solutions. The problems derive

in Beckett and nothing