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Murray Stewart Leith and Duncan Sim

Introduction Both education and employment are essential elements in any society. In this chapter, we explore the ways in which, first, the Scottish education system has been particularly valued over time and assess its current state. Second, we explore how a sense of national pride has existed in regard to Scottish industry and the contribution that the country has made through its manufacturing, while looking at the changing nature of Scottish employment over the years and the shift from a manufacturing to a service economy. There is perhaps a mythology

in Scotland
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Murray Stewart Leith and Duncan Sim

Introduction An understanding of gender is integral to appreciating how society operates and studies of gender have their roots in the historical invisibility of women in many aspects of society. Studies of the role of women can probably be dated back to the work of Mary Wollstonecraft in the late eighteenth century but are more commonly rooted in the feminist movements of the 1960s. We do not seek here to present an exhaustive study of gender, feminism and related research, but rather we explore how gender issues have affected the way Scotland is portrayed

in Scotland
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Murray Stewart Leith and Duncan Sim

Introduction As pointed out in Chapter 1, this is not a history book, nor does it seek to be. Yet, the importance of history, and the lessons that can be learned from it, echo through to many other academic disciplines, especially to politics and sociology. So much of the present is a result of actions of the past and, if we are to understand how things have come to be, we must understand what went before. It is important that we appreciate that many of the long-running sociopolitical tensions of the modern era that impact upon modern Scotland have their

in Scotland
Murray Stewart Leith and Duncan Sim

Introduction Cultural identity is important to any nation, perhaps doubly so to a stateless nation such as Scotland, as culture can help to preserve the nation’s distinctiveness. Macdonald ( 2009 ), for example, highlights how Scotland, both as a part of the UK and of the British Empire and as a nation in its own right, could be seen as both central and marginal to the major cultural forces of the age. She notes how cultural images have emerged indigenously, while at the same time the country’s culture also reflects a popular imagery ascribed to it by others

in Scotland
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Murray Stewart Leith and Duncan Sim

Introduction In our introduction, we sketched a picture of Scotland and Scottish society in which we sought to illustrate the nature of change that had produced this Scotland of the early twenty-first century. A Scotland that in the past few decades had undergone significant social, economic and most of all political change. We spoke of the huge shift in living conditions, of the nature of employment, of the social positioning of Scottish society from a very conservative to a more progressive form and of the underpinning movement of how the people of Scotland

in Scotland
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Murray Stewart Leith and Duncan Sim

Origins of the book The idea for writing this book about Scotland arose as a result of many years teaching by the two main authors at the Universities of Glasgow, Stirling and the West of Scotland. We have, separately and jointly, organised and contributed to courses and/or modules on the sociology, policy and politics of Scotland but have sometimes been quite frustrated by the lack of adequate texts to recommend to our students. For a number of years, books were often written on a UK-wide basis with limited attention (if at all) paid to the position north of

in Scotland
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D. A. J. MacPherson

2 Scotland I got it when I was in Tyrone, And I’ll get it to the last, I’ve got it here in Glasgow, And I’ve got it in Belfast. You may talk about your sporting games Or anything you choose, But each Thursday night sure I delight In my “Belfast Weekly News”.1 In September 1913, at the height of the Third Home Rule Bill crisis, the women of FLOL No. 19 gathered in their lodge room in the East End of Glasgow. While the political crisis in Ireland was foremost in their discussions that night, the social event that followed their meeting filled their Bridgeton

in Women and the Orange Order
Towards a poetics of hagiographic narration
Author: Eva von Contzen

The first book-length study of the Scottish Legendary (late 14th c.), the only extant collection of saints’ lives in the vernacular from medieval Scotland, scrutinises the dynamics of hagiographic narration, its implicit assumptions about literariness, and the functions of telling the lives of the saints. The fifty saints’ legends are remarkable for their narrative art: the enjoyment of reading the legends is heightened, while didactic and edifying content is toned down. Focusing on the role of the narrator, the depiction of the saintly characters, their interiority, as well as temporal and spatial parameters, it is demonstrated that the Scottish poet has adapted the traditional material to the needs of an audience versed in reading romance and other secular genres. The implications of the Scottish poet’s narrative strategies are analysed also with respect to the Scottishness of the legendary and its overall place in the hagiographic landscape of late medieval Britain.

The Ghaistly Eighteenth Century
Hamish Mathison

This article proposes that the popularly held model of ‘Gothic’ writings emergence in the Eighteenth Century is too partial: it tends to privilege prose fiction written in England in the latter part of the century. As a corrective, the article looks at poetry written in Scotland across the century, seeking not origins for ‘the Gothic’ as a transhistorical literary mode of expression, but emergent treatments of the supernatural that fed back into the literature of the period. It argues that poetry in eighteenth-century Scotland develops well-established indigenous supernatural tropes, especially that of the ‘ghaist’ or ghost.

Gothic Studies
Catholicism, gender and ethnicity in nineteenth-century Scotland
Author: S. Karly Kehoe

This book examines the changing nature of Catholicism in modern Scotland by placing a significant emphasis on women religious. It highlights the defining role they played in the transformation and modernisation of the Catholic Church as it struggled to cope with unprecedented levels of Irish migration. The institutions and care-networks that these women established represented a new age in social welfare that served to connect the church with Scotland's emerging civil society. The book examines how the church reacted to liberalism, legislative reform, the rise of evangelicalism and the continued growth of Irish migration between the late 1820s and the late 1850s. A mutual aversion to the Irish and a loyalty to nation and state inspired a recusant and ultramontane laity to invest heavily in a programme of church transformation and development. The recruitment of the Ursulines of Jesus, the first community of nuns to return to Scotland since the Reformation, is highlighted as a significant step towards legitimising Catholic respectability. The book focuses on the recruitment and influence of women religious. It also focuses on the issue of identity by considering how gender and ethnicity influenced the development of these religious communities and how this was connected with the broader campaign to transform Catholic culture in Scotland. The book also examines the development of Catholic education in Scotland between the late 1840s and 1900 and prioritises the role played by women religious in this process.