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Collecting and connoisseurship
Katie Donington

in Tobago as part of the marriage settlement of Richard Ottley and Sarah Elizabeth nee Young. Warner Ottley and William Young Ottley both served as trustees of the will of Drewry Ottley late of the Island of St Vincent (proved 27/08/1807), who was probably their half-brother. William Young Ottley himself, with Sarah Elizabeth Ottley, was shown

in The bonds of family
Katie Donington

issue of slave trading which took into consideration the ways in which the abolitionists had shaped their arguments. In 1796 he wrote a letter to William Manning, the Agent for St Vincent, setting out ‘a Plan for benefitting Humanity in respect to the Slave Trade’. 72 ‘Considering the matter Philanthropically’ he wished that an experiment might be undertaken which would test the

in The bonds of family
Abstract only
Katie Donington

. 119 ‘Reparations ten-point plan approved unanimously by meeting of Caribbean nations in St Vincent’, Leigh Day, 11 March 2014. www.leighday.co.uk/News/2014/March-2014/CARICOM-nations-unanimously-approve-10-point-plan [accessed 18 August 2017]. 120 David Cameron, ‘PM’s speech to the Jamaican

in The bonds of family
Douglas J. Hamilton

1763, and carried commodities from Jamaica, Grenada, St Vincent and, later, Tobago, Demerara, the Danish island of St Croix and the Dutch colony of St Eustatius. By the middle of the 1790s, it served over 220 clients in eighteen territories, an increase of over 36 per cent from the early 1770s. This expansion occurred mainly in Jamaica and the Windward Islands, while the previously central Leeward

in Scotland, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world 1750–1820
Douglas J. Hamilton

chosen by their constituents, than those of the British House of Commons’. 2 The sizes of the governments varied across the islands. In Jamaica, the legislature comprised forty-two representatives in the assembly and twelve council members appointed by the governor. In the Windwards, the assemblies were smaller: Grenada’s had twenty-four members, Dominica’s nineteen and St Vincent’s

in Scotland, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world 1750–1820
Douglas J. Hamilton

it may have been, the commentary on Bute’s disbursement of patronage was not without foundation. During his period in office, the islands of Dominica, Grenada, St Vincent and Tobago were ceded to Britain, along with East and West Florida and Quebec. In 1763, General Robert Melville was appointed governor of the Ceded Islands. His compatriot General James Grant of Ballindalloch, using his friendship

in Scotland, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world 1750–1820
Douglas J. Hamilton

transience of the population meant that there was always a demand for book-keepers, overseers, managers and, increasingly as absenteeism became more prevalent, attorneys. And for those Scots who were determined to go to the Caribbean, the acquisition of Dominica, Grenada, St Vincent and Tobago in 1763 opened up a raft of new opportunities. The Windward Islands Unlike the older English

in Scotland, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world 1750–1820
Douglas J. Hamilton

Caribbean for display in its museum, and used Dr John MacIntosh in Berbice as a local agent, to whom Caribbean artefacts were sent for onward shipment to Inverness. 85 One of the most significant manifestations of the spirit of scientific discovery was the foundation of botanical gardens. The first West Indian garden was established in St Vincent in 1765 by Governor Robert

in Scotland, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world 1750–1820
Douglas J. Hamilton

. The Scots Magazine reported that ‘Many people have tired of dry-weather estates [in Antigua] and have purchased in the new islands.’ 1 Jamaica, with large mountains forming a spine down the middle, was split into the low-lying, warmer and less healthy southern region and the more temperate northern mountain region. St Vincent was divided into two zones, the one more wooded and mountainous, the other

in Scotland, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world 1750–1820
Stephanie Barczewski

Rogers, ‘Money, Land and Lineage: The Big Bourgeoisie of Hanoverian London’, Social History 4 ( 1979 ), pp. 450–1. 13 This proportion is consistent with that identified by Simon Smith for planters from the island of St Vincent. Smith finds that between 1814 and 1834 six country houses were

in Country houses and the British Empire, 1700–1930