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Paradox or (sp)oiler of civil society activism?
Olajide O. Akanji

Introduction One of the fundamental points of debate in the world since 9/11 has been that of counter-terrorism. The events of 9/11 no doubt ushered the international community into a new realm of collective actions against terrorism, with the United Nations, European Union, United States, and many other states along with multilateral actors

in Counter-terrorism and civil society
Susanne Martin and Leonard Weinberg

1 The “new” terrorism in warfare What role will terrorism play in twenty-first century warfare? While there is evidence that wars are changing, the reasons for and consequences of these changes remain largely unknown. This study represents an effort to better understand changes in the conduct of wars and implications of these changes. In the pages that follow, the first task involves specifying the meanings of terms such as “terrorism” and “insurgency.” The chapter continues with a discussion of changes in the uses of terrorism over time, not only with regard to

in The role of terrorism in twenty-first-century warfare
Chiyuki Aoi and Yee-Kuang Heng

concerns topped the priorities of security in Japan, with terrorism coming in way down the list of concerns. However, in January 2015, news of a hostage crisis involving Japanese nationals held captive by the Islamic State (IS) in Syria was greeted by shock and bewildered surprise. Rolling media blanket coverage ensured that terrorism instantly rocketed up the security and public agenda. A typical news report suggested the brutal nature of the beheadings and videos provided a ‘shock to a country that can feel insulated from distant geopolitical problems’ and that Japan

in Non-Western responses to terrorism
Implications for human security, civil society, and charities
Kawser Ahmed and Scott N. Romaniuk

(Bearne et al., 2005 : 6). Unlike the Charity Regulatory Commission in the UK, Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) is the lead government organization monitoring charitable organizations 1 and there are guidelines about “giving” and charities are expected to follow the rules (Blumberg, 2018 ). 2 However, part six of the Anti-Terrorism Act details how

in Counter-terrorism and civil society
Insurgents’ use of terrorism at the initial stages of conflict
Susanne Martin and Leonard Weinberg

3 Terrorism as a leading ­indicator: insurgents’ use of terrorism at the initial stages of conflict Our initial concern is with terrorist activity carried out during the early stages of an armed conflict. We hope to measure the extent to which this activity is a precursor or leading indicator of a widening insurgency. We begin this effort by discussing the reasons terrorists may fail to produce insurgency. In these cases, the terrorists (or would-be insurgents) used terrorism as an initial tactic in what would equate to the early stages of their insurgent

in The role of terrorism in twenty-first-century warfare
Analytical techniques
Christopher Baker-Beall

1 Investigating the language of EU counter-terrorism: analytical techniques Introduction Research on counter-terrorism is united by a concern with the way in which various actors define, understand and respond to the threat of terrorism. However, beyond this broad commitment it is possible to identify a variety of approaches to the study of counter-terrorism that differ as a direct result of the implicit and explicit assumptions that each individual researcher makes about the social world. Traditional approaches to counter-terrorism predominantly begin from a

in The European Union’s fight against terrorism
Richard Jackson

THE ‘WAR ON TERRORISM’ is the most extensive counter-terrorist campaign in history and the most important conflict since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Its scope and expenditure of resources are so great that in a few years it could soon rival the cold war. In trying to make sense of this new historical era, there is a temptation to focus solely on its most visible

in Writing the war on terrorism
A matter of discourse
Oscar Palma

Introduction Discourses on terrorism are not foreign to Colombian society. The word is used every day by politicians, state officials, academics, journalists, analysts and people in the streets. Every Colombian has grown up understanding that terrorism is part of everyday life. The people have been victims of a wide range of actors, including drug kingpins, paramilitary squads, guerrillas and even state forces. Car bombings, armed assaults in towns, assassinations, kidnappings and massacres are common themes in the daily news. However

in Non-Western responses to terrorism
Brazil’s ambiguous entrance into the Global War on Terror
Camila de Macedo Braga and Ana Maura Tomesani

has prided itself on its pacifist culture and the absence of terrorist threats in the domestic space, the state was not immune to the global change in security patterns. As Lasmar ( 2015 ) has consistently argued, the Brazilian government’s strong denial about the presence of terrorism in Brazil (the negacionismo politics) is supported by the long-standing absence of terrorist attacks within national

in Counter-terrorism and civil society
Richard Jackson

BY THIS STAGE, IT SHOULD BE OBVIOUS that the official language of counter-terrorism implicitly constructs the ‘war on terrorism’ within the ‘virtuous’ or ‘good war’ tradition (see Lawler 2002 ). Locating the American response to the September 11, 2001 attacks in the bounds of the overarching framework of the World War II meta-narrative for

in Writing the war on terrorism