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Remi Joseph-Salisbury and Laura Connelly

identify, and perhaps some scholar-activists will want to discuss, adapt, or correct the principles we have offered here. Like all books, this work is inevitably incomplete: as are we, as anti-racist scholar-activists. We hope, however, that by drawing upon the wisdom of our participants, and that of the co-conspirators and comrades that we work and organise with, this manifesto – and the book more broadly – offers a springboard from which we can better think about the role and duties of academics in the contemporary university. We hope that it can serve as a catalyst to

in Anti-racist scholar-activism
Thomas Docherty

otherwise constant violence that would make life solitary, nasty, brutish, and short. In this view, politics exists in order to prevent us from having recourse to forms of physical violence to resolve competing interests. Unlike warring competition, it assuages our fears and allows for cooperation and cohabitation in an ecology whose key issue is that of enhanced survival. If we consider this in the more localized concern of the contemporary University, the question arises of where we might find our own ‘state’, our own over-arching authority to which all individual

in The new treason of the intellectuals
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Anti-racist scholar-activism and the neoliberal-imperial-institutionally-racist university
Remi Joseph-Salisbury and Laura Connelly

, challenges, and – what we conceive of as – forms of backlash upon those engaged in anti-racist scholar-activism. Our contention is that despite the hegemony of these forces, there remain pockets of contradiction and possibility within the contemporary university. Applying the little-known concept of constructive complicity to the neoliberal-imperial-institutionally-racist university context, we show how those engaged in scholar-activism seek to exploit these pockets of possibility to (partially) mitigate, offset, and utilise the complicities that arise from affiliating

in Anti-racist scholar-activism
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Accountability, usefulness, and accessibility
Remi Joseph-Salisbury and Laura Connelly

-activism is fundamentally shaped by a commitment to communities of resistance . 2 The in service orientation is a counter-hegemonic one, often bristling against the neoliberal technologies of the contemporary university – technologies that see academics come under pressure to orientate their work to performance metrics like the UK Research Excellence Framework (REF). As we intimated in the Introduction, whilst at first glance non-academic Impact under the REF could be seen to overlap with and even encourage or enable

in Anti-racist scholar-activism
Thomas Docherty

The exceptional and the ordinary73 3 The exceptional and the ordinary The contemporary University, shaped by the prevailing norms of market fundamentalism and the commercialization of all human interests, does not spring up like a rabbit from a magician’s hat. Like all institutions it develops historically and according to specific conditions that make its emergence seem not only possible but also reasonable or even inevitable. As an institution that tacitly embodies conventionally ­ ncontroversial – and agreed values, it passes as entirely ordinary, u merely

in The new treason of the intellectuals
Michael O’Sullivan

’s humanities faculties are being pushed to become primarily teaching institutions removed from the research-heavy science academies or centres, it is a vision, albeit with very different motivations, that is not without historical precedent. Stefan Collini has questioned the relevance of Newman’s model of the university for the contemporary university. In What Are Universities For?, he argues that Newman’s The Idea of a University was ‘addressed to a very specific and now largely forgotten question about establishing a Catholic university in Dublin’ (2012:40). One might

in The humanities and the Irish university
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If it is not mysterious, it is not social theory
Marcel Stoetzle

bit of prestige for that, but at the same time it is looked at with some suspicion. Theorists are seen as hard-working scholars only about as much as chess players are seen as hard-working sportspeople: not quite, really. No sweat there, like in an honest game of rugby or a good old feast of data-crunching. The hard-working contemporary university tends to think of a more than cursory acquaintance with the big, theoretical questions as a luxury that should not distract from the steady production of ‘deliverables’: concrete, quantifiable ‘outputs’. Asking conceptual

in Beginning classical social theory
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The home life of information
Glenn Burger and Rory Critten

: Van Eyck, Bruegel, Rubens, and Their Contemporaries (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2008), pp. 22–​3. 22 For an example of how these patterns of transmission and adaptation might work in practice, see Rory G. Critten, ‘The Secrees of Old Philisoffres and John Lydgate’s Posthumous Reputation’, Journal of the Early Book Society, 19 (2016), 31–​64. This essay charts the passage of the Secrees, which has traditionally been attributed to Lydgate, across a variety of household contexts.

in Household knowledges in late-medieval England and France
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Darrell M. Newton

Commission was important in providing a voice for West Indians, included recruitment efforts at the BBC for African-Caribbean employees, much to the dismay of the dominant press. Their participation led to cultural affairs programming such as the self-referential Open Door documentary series (BBC, 1973–76), Skin (BBC, 1979), the Black and White Media Show (BBC, 1986) and the Black Britain news-magazine series (BBC, 1995–2000). Also discussed are critical perspectives from both the mainstream and minority presses, and various contemporary university studies on race and

in Paving the empire road
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Good relations, freespeech and political activism
Ruth Sheldon

shaped as key institutional settings for the cultivation of democratic reflexivity? My suggestion is that, in order for universities to play this hoped-​for role, scholars must first attend to the historically evolving forms of epistemic and political power within their own institutions (Sangren 2007). We must explore how contemporary universities validate particular forms of knowledge, communication and relationality. These are reflected both in the epistemic hierarchies of theory and practice, in institutionalised assumptions regarding the direction of teaching and

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics