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Techniques, materials, land, energy, environments
Andrew Patrizio

their environment’. 65 Nowhere has the undecidable, the occluded, the oblique and the defamiliarised as a redress against domination and hierarchy been more productively present than in some of the ecofeminist and queer writing we turn to now. Notes 1 Demos, Decolonizing Nature: Contemporary Art and the Politics of Ecology , 38. Other projects are well summarised in ‘Short History of Eco-Art Exhibitions’ in Sue Spaid, Ecovention: Current Art to Transform Ecologies (Cincinnati, OH: Contemporary Arts Center, 2002). 2 Kester

in The ecological eye
Anne Ring Petersen

places to learn how to unlearn, in order to relearn.42 He builds his argument on Wilson’s Mining the Museum, which he considers to be ‘an exemplary case of a decolonizing perspective’ and ‘an exemplar of epistemic and aesthetic disobedience’.43 Mignolo is primarily concerned with explaining the basic tenets of decolonial thinking and how coloniality continues to be ‘an underlying syntax’ that affects ‘the entire socio-economic system and subject formation’.44 As Mignolo’s critique is not only aimed at museums, but also at Western imperial knowledge systems in general

in Migration into art
Octavian Esanu

the complete commodification or institutionalization of Western modernism – once firmly committed to politics, medium, and autonomy – to the liberalization (and privatization of the infrastructure) of second-world socialist realist modernism – which once served the struggle of the “emancipated” classes – to the full market integration of third-world modernism, once used as a weapon of class, national liberation, and decolonization. 46 The periodization of contemporary art is

in The postsocialist contemporary
Andrew Patrizio

, but rather ‘a continuous process of nurturing anarchist subjectivities’. 20 The fractal character of anarchism supports art history’s account of human creativity, value and relation, nurturing this ecological sensibility based on principles of nonhierarchical aesthetic and political subjectivities. This can be seen as part of a larger political project to ‘decolonize or revitalize the lifeworld’ as a form of resistance and ‘redirecting the system’ in whatever ways are available to us. 21 I have used ‘social ecology’ as a near synonym for anarchy, for

in The ecological eye
Catherine Spencer

( Chicago : University of Chicago Press , 2002 ), 25 . Hannah Feldman argues that the presence of Algerians in Paris, notably a street protest on 17 October 1961 against a curfew that was met with severe brutality by the CRS (Compagnies républicaines de sécurité) riot police, during which people were shot, beaten to death and drowned, ‘marked the true arrival of the French nation to the conditions of postcoloniality’ and played a key role in reconceptualisations of urban space. Hannah Feldman , From a Nation Torn: Decolonizing Art and Representation in France, 1945

in Beyond the Happening
The global exposition and the museum
Jane Chin Davidson

turn of the twenty-first century.55 At the same time, Glissant’s approach fully agrees with Papastergiadis’s analysis of the homogenization of culture that comes with capitalist globalization. However, the clear distinction can be recognized by what creolization could actually mean for the analysis of art objects, when conceived as a visual text that needs to be differentiated from Glissant’s métissage of linguistics, languages, and translations. Perhaps the most important question that Glissant raises is whether art history could be decolonized at all, particularly

in Staging art and Chineseness
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Communication studies
Catherine Spencer

, Science of Coercion: Communication Research and Psychological Warfare, 1945–1960 ( Oxford : Oxford University Press , 1994 ); and Stephen Park Turner and Jonathan H. Turner , The Impossible Science: An Institutional Analysis of American Sociology ( Newbury Park, CA : Sage , 1990 ). 49 Kristin Ross , Fast Cars, Clean Bodies: Decolonization and the Reordering of French Culture ( Cambridge, MA : MIT Press , 1995 ), 186 . 50 Sociology played a crucial role in US interventions in Latin America, as addressed in Michael E. Latham , Modernization

in Beyond the Happening
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Lights, camera and … ‘Ethical’ rule!
Susie Protschky

samenleving; de Chinese ervaring in Indonesië 1900–1942’, PhD thesis, Leiden University, 1999, p. 67; F. Colombijn with M. Barwegen, Under Construction: The Politics of Urban Space and Housing During the Decolonization of Indonesia, 1930–1960 (Leiden: KITLV Press, 2010), pp. 82, 85; Kwartanada, ‘The Tiong Hoa Hwee Koan School’, p. 30. 34 Kwartanada, ‘The Tiong Hoa Hwee Koan School’, p. 27

in Photographic subjects
Abstract only
Mass photography, monarchy and the making of colonial subjects
Susie Protschky

and Housing during the Decolonization of Indonesia, 1930–1960 (Leiden: KITLV Press, 2010), pp. 229–30. 65 For the Foltynski family history, see KITLV DH1210. On The Hague as an expatriate colonial city, see E. Captain et al. (eds), De Indische zomer in Den Haag; Het cultureel erfgoed van de Indische hoofdstad (Leiden: KITLV Press, 2005). 66

in Photographic subjects
The history of classical Mexican cinema and its scholarship
Dolores Tierney

, where the popular classes proved to have a radical and productive, rather than passive, relationship toward dominant/mass culture. This change in perspective has also been noted on an intercontinental level. Global perspectives, namely those of Arjun Appadurai, have allowed academics to note how the popular classes of neocolonized or decolonized countries are also active and critical subjects of an imperialist mass culture and work to

in Emilio Fernández