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From ‘effet de retour’ to unnaturalness
Pascale Drouet

.4.25–36) For Richard II, this is truly symptomatic of ‘the eagle-winged pride / Of sky-aspiring and ambitious thoughts’ (1.3.129–30) of Bolingbroke’s implicit challenging of the doctrine of divine right. What better punishment than banishment for this Bolingbroke, who might incite the king’s subjects ‘to banish their affects with him’ (1.4.30)? What better nemesis than geographical deterritorialisation for

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
Abstract only
New York 1917
Dafydd W. Jones

222 The fictions of Arthur Cravan 7 j ‘Pure affect’: New York 1917 Deterritorialisation The present study is premised on a processing of philosophical positions into the descriptive recovery of Cravan, in an attempt to yield sense from what frequently appear to be nonsensical cultural positions that the idea of Cravan occupies. His perpetual escape from ‘an original territory’ through extensive movement renders for us the becoming of Arthur Cravan. The process of movement that is productive of change is described in Deleuze and Guattari’s last collaborative

in The fictions of Arthur Cravan
Siobhán McIlvanney

littérature mineure (Paris: Minuit, ); in other words, ‘le branchement de l’individuel sur l’immédiat-politique, l’agence- Beur female identity  ment collectif d’énonciation’ (p. ) (‘the connection of the individual to a political immediacy, and the collective assemblage of enunciation’ (Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature, trans. Dana Polan (Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, ), p. )). The third characteristic, ‘la déterritorialisation de la langue’ (p. ) (‘the deterritorialisation of language’ (p. )) is apparent in the linguistic

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
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A queer and cartographic exploration of the Palestinian diaspora in Randa Jarrar’s A Map of Home (2008) and Him, Me, Muhammad Ali (2016)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

-induced deterritorialisation, while examining the articulation of bodies as maps and as the physical and textual repositories of colonial and patriarchal violence. Here, bodies are also explored as cyphers disorientating national and diasporic Arab and Islamicate gender and sexual expectations. A Map of Home ’s first-person viewpoint conveys a sense of urgency about the self-validation of queer bodies in both literal and symbolic ways. In order to understand the multiple connections between Jarrar’s diasporic experiences and her fiction, it is necessary to have a

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Abstract only
Pascale Drouet

makes a last effort, imploring, ‘Banish us both, and send the King with me’ (83), ‘Then whither he goes, thither let me go’ (85). There is no deterritorialisation whatsoever as long as she stays with him. The same idea is to be found in King Lear : what matters to Lear, whether in prison or elsewhere, is to remain with Cordelia. Once the war is lost, Cordelia turns to her father and affirms, ‘For thee

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
Pascale Drouet

deterritorialisation does not have the same end in King Richard II and Coriolanus . Bolingbroke is not interested in ‘smooth spaces’ per se . These have only a transitional strategic function; ironically, they pave the way for the new ‘striated space’ he wants to reign over (King Henry IV’s England). As for Coriolanus, he feels at home on battlefields, not in the Capitol; he has no taste for the ‘striated space

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
Pascale Drouet

-down with a Forum that would be more powerful than the Capitol, and to exclude the patricians from the city – an exclusion that is implicit in Sicinius’ rhetorical question: ‘What is the city but the people?’ (3.1.200). The threat of patrician deterritorialisation is heard in Coriolanus’ criticism of the tribunes’ growing power: ‘That is the way to lay the city flat, / To bring the roof to the foundation

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
Locating the globalgothic
Justin D. Edwards

, travelling ideas and narrative shifts. The genealogy of zombie narratives, for example, is often traced from an African diaspora and the forced movement of people from West Africa to the Caribbean and then, later, to the United States where they were adapted for such films as I Walked with a Zombie ( 1943 ) and Dawn of the Dead ( 1978 ). 1 Such deterritorialisations can help us to reflect historically on the pressure of

in Globalgothic
Fred Botting and Justin D. Edwards

nervous temporality of the transitional, or the emergent provisionality of the “present”’ (216). Gone are the fixed meanings of binary structures, clear borders, cultural coherence or causes and effects. In their place we find flows and disjunctions in the ‘stubborn chunks’ of cultural identification, as well as a reiteration of migrations, displacements, translations, deterritorialisations and

in Globalgothic
Pascale Drouet

rhizomatic rather than arborescent. After pointing to the diversity of armies, the absence of unity and the rivalry that could develop during expeditions, Flori concludes, ‘it is clear that the crusade, more than a unique expedition led by the papal legate, was a coalition of warlords, each of whom had his own ambition and conception of discipline’. 14 There were also stakes of deterritorialisation and reterritorialisation

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory