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Afterword by Andy Haldane
Andy Haldane

evaluating policies which reshape these systems. In this role, units of measurement have been fundamental to scientific, and indeed societal, advance. When we turn to the social sciences, the units of measurement are less well-established and understood. There are rarely unified laws or agreed conventions. Instead there is custom and practice. This does not make the chosen units of measurement good or bad, right or wrong. But it does make them a point of debate and, sometimes, a bone of contention. This fascinating book, Foundational economy, can be seen as a contribution

in Foundational economy
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Foundational matters

, to schools and care homes – in what we call the foundational economy . Individual consumption depends on market income, while foundational consumption depends on infrastructure and delivery systems of networks and branches, which are neither created nor renewed automatically, even as incomes increase. The distinctive, primary role of public policy should therefore be to secure the supply of basic services for all citizens. If the aim is citizen well-being and flourishing for the many not the few, then European politics at regional, national and EU level needs to

in Foundational Economy

. These authors were writing for urban planners and social policy technocrats, inducted into a rationalist conception of science and engineering problem-solving as analytic and sequential. As the opening quotation shows, Rittel and Webber wrote from what might be termed an end of history position on what we call the foundational economy: they assumed that all the infrastructure had been built and the material problems of urban life had been solved. Hence the assertion that in the 1970s planners and policymakers would be moving on to tackle trickier problems in

in Foundational Economy
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There’s more than one show in town
Andrew Bowman, Ismail Ertürk, Julie Froud, Sukhdev Johal, and John Law

foundational economy. This is an infra economy producing mundane goods and services which is beneath notice for much of the time. • Second, we can take Braudel’s brilliant contrarian insight that capitalism is not only about the establishment of a free competitive market but also about entrenching an anti-­market (contre marché) system in which the state is the guarantor of a monopoly that benefits a few. Again, the nature and form of state intervention and the forms of monopoly need to be rethought for our times. To do this we reframe politics by returning to the idea of

in The end of the experiment?
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Private greed, political negligence and housing policy after Grenfell

As the tragedy of the Grenfell Tower fire of 14 June 2017 has slowly revealed a shadowy background of outsourcing and deregulation, and a council turning a blind eye to health and safety concerns, many questions need answers. Stuart Hodkinson has those answers. Safe as Houses weaves together Stuart’s research over the last decade with residents’ groups in council regeneration projects across London to provide the first comprehensive account of how Grenfell happened and how it could easily have happened in multiple locations across the country. It draws on examples of unsafe housing either refurbished or built by private companies under the Private Finance Initiative (PFI) to show both the terrible human consequences of outsourcing and deregulation and how the PFI has enabled developers, banks and investors to profiteer from highly lucrative, taxpayer-funded contracts. The book also provides shocking testimonies of how councils and other public bodies have continuously sided with their private partners, doing everything in their power to ignore, deflect and even silence those who speak out. The book concludes that the only way to end the era of unsafe regeneration and housing provision is to end the disastrous regime of self-regulation. This means strengthening safety laws, creating new enforcement agencies independent of government and industry, and replacing PFI and similar models of outsourcing with a new model of public housing that treats the provision of shelter as ‘a social service’ democratically accountable to its residents.

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Alex Schafran, Matthew Noah Smith, and Stephen Hall

example, a group of economists, whose focus is on what they call the ‘Foundational Economy’, argue specifically for more attention to be paid to the economies we rely on – health and care, electricity and water, the often overlooked ‘mundane’ economies that we need to survive but that aren’t seen to drive competitive economies. 23 In a series of publications, foundational economists have shown both how big and how important the foundational economy is, and how desperately we need a new approach to the political economy of these vital societal functions. 24 As

in The spatial contract
Imaginary, history and cases Introduction
Andrew Bowman, Ismail Ertürk, Julie Froud, Sukhdev Johal, and John Law

argument for a broader alternative vision in two specific respects. First, after thirty years of failure in tradable goods, we argue that the British need to focus on another, more mundane and sheltered economy which we call ‘the foundational economy’ which delivers everyday goods and services. Not only is this an economy that is overlooked in the present policy climate, but the sectoral cases show how it is being damaged by point value corporate business models. Second, we argue that the crucial obstacles to policy reforms that might develop the foundational economy are

in The end of the experiment?
Martin Yuille and Bill Ollier

. There are just two changes and both involve rolling out two existing technologies on a bigger scale. One technology is the development and deployment of ‘risk biomarkers’. The other is improved data integration and management. Both are part of the infrastructure that will support the Health Society and national prosperity as part of the ‘foundational economy’. 1 Risk biomarkers The needs that define health – vital, social and agency needs – are often discussed in a socio-political context. However, in a scientific context, they can be dealt with as if they

in Saving sick Britain
Alex Schafran, Matthew Noah Smith, and Stephen Hall

more true if we move beyond resource-intensive reliance systems to ones based more in human capital, for example healthcare, education, media, policing, etc. 38 See also A. Bowman, I. Ertürk, J. Froud, S. Johal and J. Law, The End of the Experiment? From Competition to the Foundational Economy (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2014), and J. Earle, C. Moran and Z. Ward-Perkins, The Econocracy (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016). 39 See A. Schafran, The Road to Resegregation: Northern California and the Failure of

in The spatial contract