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Migrant poetics
Paul Carter

household chores’ (See www.robertburns.org/encyclopedia/DavidsonBetty.274.shtml ) and ‘the faithful servant’ of Major Lowsley (See https://limerickslife.com/military-cemetery/ ). 28 White Ladies were a staple of Victorian folklore and I suspect Dawson's name referred to a human genre not a physical appearance. 29

in Translations, an autoethnography
Open Access (free)
Lorenzo Ferrarini and Nicola Scaldaferri

forms of relationship between text and image, and to explore their distinctive possibilities. The formats that we have employed are essentially of three different kinds, though all of them could be considered different interpretations of the photo essay genre (Sutherland 2016b ). The first format is used in chapters 1 and 2 , in relation respectively to the Maggio festival in Accettura and the carnival bells of San Mauro Forte. Here, the essays and the photographic sequences are developed as separate narratives that maximise the distinctive characteristics of

in Sonic ethnography
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Modelling, ethnography and the challenge of the anthropocene
Hannah Knox

recommendation engines (Seaver 2015), and Eitan Wilf ’s (2013) work on the creation of a Jazzcomposing robot, likewise explore the principles at play in the development of such data-driven devices. In both these cases the principle that lies at the heart of these technological artefacts is the promise of being able to build meaning out of the relationship that exists between discrete data streams. In both cases, categories or genres (of music) are replaced by patterns or clusterings that derive from principles of association. Whilst these ethnographic studies unravel some of

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
Dawn Nafus

that some of our data had numerical qualities (nonnormal distribution) that Data Sense was not optimised to handle. It took the intervention of someone more fluent in statistics to spot it, and figure out a workaround. While we put ourselves in a position to be able to defy genres of big data calculation and expose the limitations of epidemiology – to get it ‘wrong’ for the right reasons – we also risked stumbling into problems that others have indeed thought more deeply about, like non-normal distribution, that, if not caught, could be used by others to undermine

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
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The name dispute and the Prespa Agreement
Rozita Dimova

beyond the conventional approaches in the border genre. Porosity in action If we could identify one common feature of this border in the 100-plus years since its establishment, it is its porosity. Regardless of the regimes on both sides of the border and the historical and political events taking place in the region, this border has been porous, allowing a continuous “leakage” of people, goods, ideas, or capital. Deriving from the Greek word pore , meaning “passage,” porosity is the

in Border porosities
Enacting human rights in mental health care in Ghana
Ursula M. Read

, Jorun Rugkasa and Tom Burns (pp. 301–314 ). Oxford : Oxford University Press . Atilola , O. and F. Olayiwola ( 2013 ) ‘ Frames of mental illness in the Yoruba genre of Nigerian movies: implications for orthodox mental health care ’, Transcultural Psychiatry 50 ( 3 ), 442–54 . doi: 10

in Global health and the new world order
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Migrant prehistory
Paul Carter

Jefferies, commenting on the anomie of the labouring class in rural Wiltshire saw no solution except emigration or ‘village organisation’ to reclaim some powers of local self-government. Trying to remedy the mass unemployment caused by enclosure, Joseph Arch distinguished between migration (by which he meant relocation inside England – recommended) and emigration (to Canada, Australia, etc. – a last measure), but even by these criteria the Carters were stay-at-homes. A name like ours – defining a genre of labour, it suggested the irrelevance of any personal identification

in Translations, an autoethnography
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The endless arrival
Paul Carter

odds with the neo-colonialist pieties of the new nation state. A new monumental simulacrum of the past has, again, settled the past as past; and the place spirits, if they approached to see what we were doing, have retreated further than ever. Both Jadi Jadian and its predecessor, Light , were conceived as walking dramas. Culturally, they were kinds of Miracle Play. Conceptually, there were elements reminiscent of the genre of urban pageant whose best-known representative is the RamLila performed in the town of Ramnagar

in Translations, an autoethnography
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Parables of return
Paul Carter

On my shelves are notebooks numbered from A1 forwards. The initial not only refers to a geographical shift but to a change of genre. Earlier notebooks kept in Italy or Spain are poetic or ecphrastic jottings, first-hand accounts of inner developments and external impressions. They typically juxtapose draft poems and prose passages that draw in recent reading, looking and walking, and draw out whatever aesthetic lessons reside there. There is a sustained diary from Venice but given the disproportion between the collective vision and its

in Translations, an autoethnography
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Nostalgia and al-zaman al-gamiil (the ‘beautiful old times’)
Mona Abaza

music genres defies any logic. It also fascinates me, as I think it could well be the subject of a superb anthropological work on Cairo’s unique and disturbing soundscapes as an expression of the increasing ‘disjunctures’ (to borrow from Appadurai) of globalisation (Appadurai 1990: 295) as well as the specificity of the ‘glocalisation’ processes. But practically speaking, one has to wonder whether the multilingual songs – German lullabies, high Arabic or colloquial Sufi zikr and other religious music, famous Arabic film songs, or Egyptian belly dances – really have

in Cairo collages