Search results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 24 items for :

  • "materiality" x
  • Methods and Guides x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

fall into the common trap of thinking that because (presumably) your tutor or examiner knows the material you are presenting, you do not need to spell things out. The reverse is the case. Reflecting on why your tutors are the readers will remind you that although they already know the material, their task is to check how well you know it. The sooner they can breathe a sigh of relief on discovering that you have shown that you know it well and have marshalled your points appropriately to support a carefully thought-through argument clearly and coherently, the

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

become particularly significant, reflecting a more active ‘use’ of materials found online. Carpentier et al. ( 2014a ) caution that this can imply that passive consumption of communication materials is in some way second best and that studies on how people use digital and social media simply as a focus for their attention are lacking: The incessant and rapid changes in media technologies, production practices, content and audience behaviours tend to attract our attention, while a considerable number of stabilities can be found underneath these changes. Even

in Creative research communication
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

a festival or drawings of the map that they took in a museum visit. Document analysis Draws data from contextual documentation Efficient in using existing materials of aspects that can have an impact on activity beyond those visible to participants Context of

in Creative research communication
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

, activity or problem in the ‘real’ world which is not yet expressed in sociological terms. So the very first task is highly likely to be working out how to transform or translate your interest into one that is characterised sociologically. This is an especially important stage, which is far too commonly insufficiently well developed. Responding to the question(s) that you devise should involve significant independent work. This will mean locating and studying a large collection of library materials, possibly drawing on archives or repositories of data, in order to

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

might have. You may decide to include them in an institutional website or research repository (this would apply to any type of research communication dissemination; you might also submit materials like plans for an activity, scripts or other outputs to this type of resource), but unless you have a troop of dedicated readers it may be unlikely that they will be regularly accessed. Box 12.1 contains some tips on how to make reports more usable. Generally, reports tend to be more accessible than some other types of publication, as they are often fairly readily

in Creative research communication
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

repurposed materials. Web 2.0 technologies have made it possible for anyone to become a content producer, or what Bruns ( 2006 ) calls a ‘produser’, eliminating the need for a middleman or gatekeeper who traditionally mediates access to older, more expensive media and technologies (e.g. journalists or web designers). This has the advantage that researchers can now reach many potential publics directly by engaging in digital communication opportunities. It has the disadvantage that the digital space is becoming very crowded, and being heard amid the cacophony of

in Creative research communication
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

his theory of motivation, suggests creativity is part of self-actualisation, and many others have argued for some type of ‘personal’ creativity (e.g. Richards, 2007 ; Craft, 2003 ; Runco, 1996 ). Boden ( 2004 ) argues that everyone is creative to a degree and suggests that what is important to creativity is that the idea is new to the individual (rather than new to society as a whole). Gauntlett terms this ‘everyday creativity’, which he defines as: refer[ring] to a process which brings together at least one active human mind, and the material or

in Creative research communication
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

is possible, whereas may means that it is allowed, for example ‘you can break the law but you may not do so’. Centre means the point that is equidistant from all sides and so should not be followed by the word ‘around’, as in ‘this chapter centres around the topic’, which should instead be ‘this chapter centres on the topic’. Data refers to the collection of raw material, for example a number of interview transcripts or a spreadsheet of figures, and is not synonymous with information , which refers to data which have not been interpreted, so

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

of the contact possible between individuals (e.g. in a social media context the ways that social cues are present through written, visual or auditory material) and comprises elements of intimacy and immediacy. Kaplan and Haenlein ( 2010 ) argue that blogs are high on self-presentation/disclosure but low on social presence/ media richness, because the author has control over the medium and there is relatively little opportunity for interaction or intimacy. In this sense, blogs might be considered as offering little opportunity (beyond asynchronous comments functions

in Creative research communication
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

and humanities) and the arts. The chapter considers art inspired by research and art that uses research tools and materials within the work itself, as well as research inspired by art. The chapter moves on to explore the relationships between artists and researchers and the potential for the instrumental use of either discipline. It considers audiences for these types of artworks and addresses the potential of what Emma Weitkamp calls ‘SciCraft’ as a means of engaging audiences with research and technology. From a practical perspective, the chapter explores the

in Creative research communication