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Roger Singleton-Turner

. However, a weather forecast, for instance, of 90 words should run close to 30 seconds, given an average delivery. My own experience as a new Director in a multi-camera studio was that everything seemed to be happening very fast. This led to my feeling that delivery was on the fast side. However, when I got to the edit, where things were usually calmer, the delivery could seem too slow! If the (less experienced) Director feels the delivery is a bit fast, it’s probably about right – but this is where the Producer can be very helpful. With a mind less cluttered by the

in Cue and Cut
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Dave Rolinson

critical respect afforded to television directors: the specificity of television. Although my approaches to some of Clarke’s filmed work demonstrate a fluid interplay between Television and Film Studies approaches, I also devote much space to those productions which require a different methodology: television plays recorded in multi-camera studios and on Outside Broadcast. By doing so, I attend to Clarke’s experiences and skills as a director, and also attend to issues of aesthetics. The lack of writing on television directors is all the more surprising since they played

in Alan Clarke
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‘It’s not a question of ignorance, Laurence, it’s a question of taste’
Ruth Adams

enduring popularity. Michael Coveney describes the broadcast version as looking like ‘some weird episode of The Good Life with a kind of acid undertow to it’. 9 This is due in part to the use of the multi-camera studio method which at the time was the dominant production method for both comedy and drama. Of the 298 Play for Today s transmitted between 1970 and 1984, only

in Screen plays
Richard Hewett

as The Way Ahead (1944), Brighton Rock (1947) and Escape (1948), it was his vulnerable performance as a rugby talent scout in Lindsay Anderson’s This Sporting Life (1963) which caught Verity Lambert’s attention. Hartnell was also well used to the pressures of multi-​camera studio, having played CSM Bullimore for two years of the live sitcom The Army Game (ITV, 1957–​61). Co-​stars William Russell and Jacqueline Hill, playing teachers Ian Chesterton and Barbara Wright, also possessed a mix of stage and screen experience. Russell had started in repertory, while Hill

in The changing spaces of television acting
Richard Hewett

’s far better to do a multi-​camera studio course, because you really learn about angles, and what each camera can give you, and how you can cut that together; you learn to edit. And then when you go and do single camera it’s not easier; it’s just there’s something you’ve already got into your brain. You know how to angle the camera and get all the different angles to make it look attractive and interesting. (Ibid.) 139 140 T h e cha ng in g s p ac es o f t e l e vis io n  act i ng off the hook in close-​up on the right of the screen (Figure 3.7). The next shot is

in The changing spaces of television acting
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Amanda Wrigley and John Wyver

Pinter and Henrik Ibsen, respectively. Greenhalgh suggests that the survival of all seven television productions of Middleton to date—all but one of which are multi-camera studio recordings—allows a rare and important opportunity ‘to compare the televisual treatment of the content and conventions of one body of early modern theatre plays from the mid-1960s to the first decade of the twenty-first century

in Screen plays
Richard Hewett

rehearsal process makes the production similar to stage work, the absence of a live audience does not seem to be as relevant a factor to Woodyatt as to Gatiss –​perhaps because the EastEnders actor is more accustomed to (audience-​less) multi-​ camera studio production. As seen earlier, multi-​camera requires actors to maintain continuity of performance while remaining conscious of various technical issues such as blocking. In his live scenes the experienced Woodyatt demonstrates a keen awareness of the importance of physical positioning, both within the set and in the

in The changing spaces of television acting
An introduction
Roger Singleton-Turner

daylight in the UK – direct sunlight – is around 4,500–6,500 K. Cloudy-bright skies are around 7,500 K and overcast skies can exceed 8,000 K. (Paraphrased from Watts 1997, pp. 211–12) In the past, this was all you would need to know if you worked in Production. If you have to work on location as a Shooter–Director, even occasionally, it would pay you to go into more detail so that you can deal with the times when you need a half-CTB or a quarter-CTO gel (colour temperature blue and colour temperature orange respectively). In multi-camera studios, the Lighting

in Cue and Cut
Middleton’s tragedies on television, 1965–2009
Susanne Greenhalgh

—all dramaturgical elements that potentially pose challenges for successful television adaptation. As Sarah Cardwell ( 2014 ) has argued, adaptations of the same text can produce markedly different aesthetic effects resulting from the technological practices prevalent in different decades. As all but one of the adaptations are multi-camera studio productions, they particularly invite comparison of the ways in which script, setting and

in Screen plays
The Harold Pinter season on Theatre 625 (BBC2, 1967)
Amanda Wrigley and Billy Smart

exterior film sequences, The Basement ’s interiors are marked by an acute sense of the possibilities of the television studio, combining multi-camera studio technique (of sharply defined images and quick, rhythmical, cutting between characters) with greater post-production editing than was customary in this period. This makes the décor of the basement itself a weapon between characters, immediately

in Screen plays