Search results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 20 items for :

  • "novice mistress" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
How did laywomen become nuns in the early modern world?
Elizabeth A. Lehfeldt

such a ceremony from a fifteenth-century guide for English Benedictine nuns. 2 The event took place at the altar of the convent church with the other nuns looking on from their stalls in the choir. The novice read her profession in the presence of a priest, made the sign of a cross in the book of profession, approached the altar with her novice mistress, kissed the altar, bowed

in Conversions
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

shortsighted, which she understood as an impediment to entry into religious life. She read in the newspaper a small article written by Georgiana Fullerton about the newly founded Poor Servants of the Mother of God, which accepted pious women with a religious vocation but limited means. In 1871, she travelled to London to meet Frances Taylor, founder of the congregation.37 Two years later, she was a professed sister and by 1875, as Sister Mary Gertrude, she was the assistant and novice mistress of this growing congregation. The Poor Servants of the Mother of God, founded in

in Contested identities
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

religious life were leading to the ‘emancipation’ of women religious. But did she consider that a good thing? Speaking to novice mistresses on a training day in the early 1960s, she underscored the difficulties that women religious faced, inside and outside the convent and in the ‘critical eyes of the world’. Disparaging female religious who were ignorant of world problems, she instead expected them to be aware of the major ‘crisis of their times’: atomic weapons, strike mentality, ‘atheistic communism’ and the break-up of family life. At the same time she regretted the

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Laurence Lux-Sterritt

, after her trial period, the postulant was physically handed back to secular life by the novice mistress, the prioress and her two assistants, who returned her to her parents at the cloister gate. The prioress said to them: ‘I give you back your daughter, she is free to remain in the world or to embrace Holy Religion.’ The postulant then walked through the city streets to the main entrance of the church; this was the last time she would be seen outside with her relatives, and the last time she entered her church through its main doors. Once given away to the officiant

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
Abstract only
Being Irish in nineteenth-century Scotland and Canada
S. Karly Kehoe

by grooming Scottish women for positions of authority within the convents and these included superior, assistant superior and/or novice mistress. If possible Irish women were blocked from these positions, whereas some were discouraged from even applying for entry to a community or, if they did get in, were blackballed from progressing beyond the stage of postulant or novice. While there is no doubt that some had no vocation and instead looked to convent life as a means of achieving security, particularly in old age, others were rejected because they were Irish. Non

in Women and Irish diaspora identities
Abstract only
S. Karly Kehoe

Scotland. Statistics that outline the nationality and family connections of 16 Creating a Scottish Church the convent leadership and membership are used as evidence of this. This section also includes a discussion about the clerical control that was exerted over the two key posts in a convent, that of mother superior and novice mistress, and it is argued that the close scrutiny of these positions demonstrates a precise clerical understanding of the ability of women religious to influence those under their care. The fourth chapter examines the development of Catholic

in Creating a Scottish Church
Carmen M. Mangion

Deceased Sisters (1935), pp. 107–8. 62 SND: ‘Clapham Annals II: Notre Dame in England’, 1851–1860. 63 SMG: I/D ‘Beaumont’, 1875, p. 24. 64 Cecil Kerr, Memoir of a Sister of Charity: Lady Etheldreda Fitzalan Howard (London, Burns Oates & Washbourne, 1928), p. 20. 66 Developing identities in Brighton. Potter found that she did not quite ‘fit’ with the Mercy style of spirituality. Her novice mistress believed she was better suited to a contemplative life. Mary Potter left the Sisters of Mercy in Brighton and eventually became founder of the Little Company of Mary.65

in Contested identities
Carmen M. Mangion

reunite with others from their congregation: novice mistresses, fellow classmates from the novitiate and former work colleagues. This was the time and place to revitalise their physical and spiritual energy and renew old friendships. The convent was another important geographic space; it was the smaller unit of congregation life and, for the majority of women religious, the location of their daily lives. The convent was where they lived, worked, prayed and recuperated from their labours alongside other women with similar beliefs and aspirations. These daily

in Contested identities
Carmen Mangion

feature of religious life. Born after the war, she benefited from a post-Butler education: she was educated at a Catholic secondary modern, then attended a further education college and enrolled in a nursing course. Yet, she was being taught in the mid-1960s novitiate about a blind obedience that meant being treated as a child even to the point of having to ask to take a bath. Nuns and sisters were being introduced to new thinking on obedience. Even before the Second Vatican Council, Dominican Henry St John, speaking at a training workshop for novice mistresses at

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Laurence Lux-Sterritt

constitutions of Paris highlighted the crucial importance of ‘the right education of Novices’, upon which ‘all good order & discipline & true Religion doe depend’.25 The novice mistress supervised them and acted as an elder sister who taught her younger siblings how to behave in the family and how to serve it well. The abbess and her council therefore chose her amongst the more experienced and achieved professed Sisters: she was to be able ‘to gain Soules by words, but more by example’. Under her care, novices learnt to sing and to say the divine office, to perform all

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century