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Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

efforts? Is the expansion a symptom of a chronic nostalgia in a society in crisis, which creates an increasing need? Or is the expansion an expression of a growing moral duty to tell about, remember, or preserve remains of previous generations? Is it thus to be interpreted as an expression of progress or as a sign of decay? Are we witnessing people’s increasing ability to tell about, remember, and preserve – or have people lost the ability to be silent, forget, and lose? Why not permit silence, oblivion, and impermanence? Why not simply let the past remain the past

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

heritage concept, we can follow the development of what is designated by the concept; that is, both thinking and practice concerning the need to protect and preserve remains from the past for the future. The history of preservation from Antiquity to the present is very clearly set out in narratives intended to legitimise current antiquarian legislation and institutions. Over time, changing concepts have been used to designate what is to be protected and preserved: antiquities, historic monuments, and heritage. In From Antiquities to Heritage (2014), the cultural

in Heritopia
Emily Cock

–8 (correspondence with Martha Teach Gnudi). Updegraff cited one of his own copies of De curtorum chirurgia in his article ‘The Problem of Rhinoplasty’. 3 ‘Physician’, in Read, Chirurgorum comes , sig. A4 r . 4 See for example: Zigarovich, ‘Preserved Remains’; Noble, Medical Cannibalism . 5 Cook, Trials of an Ordinary Doctor , pp 122, 243. 6 Richard Browne, Prosodia Pharmacopæorum , sigs a3 v , a4 v . 7 Burnby, ‘Bernard, Francis’. 8 Cook, ‘Medical Innovation’, p. 89. 9 Ibid ., p. 73. 10 Groenevelt, Safe Internal Use of Cantharides, sigs b2 v , K5 r , K7 v

in Rhinoplasty and the nose in early modern British medicine and culture
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

arouses distaste is the new role of the museums as a mass medium, the bringing to life of a reconstructed past, the shift in emphasis from education to entertainment and consumption, from the elevated to the everyday, from texts to images and materiality, from the authentic to replicas, and from older periods to modernity, the present, and the future. It can also be noted that whereas museums are perceived as a sign of crisis, archives and libraries hardly ever are, even though they also protect and preserve remains of the past. Clearly, then, the crisis stems not

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

Netherlands ‘terp’ made use of some bog plants: ‘with the sedge and the rushes of the marsh they make cords, and with these they weave their nets’ (cited in Mayhoff 1906 : Bk 16: 1). One of the most common ‘finds’ from the bog listed by later authors were the preserved remains of trees, representing the submerged vegetation from the earliest phase of its transformation into a bog. Some thought these were relics of the biblical flood (cited in Leigh 1700 : 89; de la Pryme 1870 : 983) or else evidence of ‘ye burning and chopping of ye same [trees in the moss] by the

in Bog bodies
Abstract only
Everyone must die
Andrew Ginger

dreamworld of the dead Once dead, the preserved remains of biological creatures may become their own kind of nocturne dreamworld, not just persisting through history past death, but enabling connections through new aesthetic patterns. They may become doubly abstracted, drawn away ( abs-trahere ) from their original place and time, and into configurations of shapes beyond their original form of life, or at least our immediate experience of it. In 1873, the French scientist Jules Luys offered to the public his Photographic Iconography of the Nervous Centres

in Instead of modernity