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Roger Singleton-Turner

duplicating tasks and reducing set-up times’ (Pennington, Broadcast , 5 June 2009). Though many genres have used Location Directors and Studio Directors for years, this way of thinking might well expand in the future if it really can be shown to cut costs. This does not necessarily mean it is always artistically desirable! ‘[R]emember the cost of over-shooting. “The more you shoot, the longer it takes to log and digitise” says [Claire Featherstone, Flame TV’s director of production]’ (Pennington, Broadcast , 5 June 2009) She was referring to single-camera shooting

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Roger Singleton-Turner

second camera, then close on person B (or C2S of B + C) on a third camera then back to the original wide, or to a modified framing. It would also work to separate two wide shots on two different cameras with a close shot on a third camera. NB: On a single-camera shoot, it is tempting to shoot a master of an entire scene on one angle, then to shoot the details. In fact, the number of times that the same establishing wide shot is useful at both the beginning and the end of a scene is limited, so it could be a waste of time, at least on a long scene. A true 16 : 9

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