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A history of the Collegiate Church and Cathedral, 1421 to the present
Editor: Jeremy Gregory

Founded in 1421, the Collegiate Church of Manchester, which became a cathedral in 1847, is of outstanding historical and architectural importance. But until now it has not been the subject of a comprehensive study. Appearing on the 600th anniversary of the Cathedral’s inception by Henry V, this book explores the building’s past and its place at the heart of the world's first industrial city, touching on everything from architecture and music to misericords and stained glass. Written by a team of renowned experts and beautifully illustrated with more than 100 photographs, this history of the ‘Collegiate Church’ is at the same time a history of the English church in miniature.

Author: Laura Varnam

The church as sacred space places the reader at the heart of medieval religious life, standing inside the church with the medieval laity in order to ask what the church meant to them and why. It examines the church as a building, idea, and community, and explores the ways in which the sanctity of the church was crucial to its place at the centre of lay devotion and parish life. At a time when the parish church was facing competition for lay attention, and dissenting movements such as Lollardy were challenging the relevance of the material church, the book examines what was at stake in discussions of sanctity and its manifestations. Exploring a range of Middle English literature alongside liturgy, architecture, and material culture, the book explores the ways in which the sanctity of the church was constructed and maintained for the edification of the laity. Drawing on a wide range of contemporary theoretical approaches, the book offers a reading of the church as continually produced and negotiated by the rituals, performances, and practices of its lay communities, who were constantly being asked to attend to its material form, visual decorations, and significance. The meaning of the church was a dominant question in late-medieval religious culture and this book provides an invaluable context for students and academics working on lay religious experience and canonical Middle English texts.

Jasmine Allen

44 2 A multitude of displays [P]‌ainted glass is the one art treated with indifference –​its specimens are put about anywhere, without classification and without regard to place or distance. – Thomas Gambier Parry, 18671 The varied approaches to displaying stained glass, in both official exhibition buildings and unofficial private pavilions, demonstrated further uncertainty over its classification and display requirements. At these events, stained glass was presented in wide-​ ranging contexts, some of which were more effective and prominent than others

in Windows for the world
Jim Cheshire

ALTHOUGH much of this book is devoted to a detailed examination of small and medium-scale glass-painting ateliers, in order to understand the revival of stained glass it is crucial to ask just why the big studios were so successful. This is not an easy question to answer, but some conclusions can be drawn about how studios related to each other, and how they worked within the market as a whole. This chapter

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
Exhibitors and their networks
Jasmine Allen

127 4 Competition and exchange: exhibitors and their networks [H]‌ow is one to study nineteenth-​and early twentieth-​century stained glass by remaining closed in one’s own country? Glass and stained glass windows were exported and imported, large firms set up trading posts abroad and sent their representatives over there, glass makers moved around, models were circulated …. The production of stained glass became internationalised and it is evident that the more famous studios’ participation in the large international exhibitions favoured this globalisation of

in Windows for the world
The Visual Politics and Narratives of Red Cross Museums in Europe and the United States, 1920s to 2010s
Sönke Kunkel

. The background, a painted canvas, showed a panorama of the destroyed city while in the foreground the drama of relief was illustrated through a three-dimensional model of the hospitals put up to help the wounded. Reflecting the state of the art in the museum world, the exhibit worked with electrical lights to stage and dramatize objects and used stained glass windows designed by Louis Tiffany of New York. In addition, the museum also impressed through large, portentous

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Jim Cheshire

A mere artisan? JOHN TOMS inhabited a different world from the people who produced the ecclesiological discourse on stained glass. It is doubtful whether he set out to gain artistic credibility, at least in the same sense that William Warrington did; nor did he represent himself as a pious religious artist producing Christian art. In fact, more than anyone, Toms resembled Winston’s worst nightmare: the

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
Abstract only
St Michael and All Angels, Sowton and St Mary the Virgin, Ottery St Mary
Jim Cheshire

THIS CHAPTER will explore how windows were used in two specific ecclesiastical interiors and what aspirations patrons and architects had for the stained glass in these churches. The preceding case studies have examined how glass-painters made and promoted their windows and it is now necessary to look at stained glass from the patron’s perspective. The two glazing projects described in this chapter

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
Jim Cheshire

THE BEER FAMILY made stained glass from the earliest days of the Victorian Gothic Revival and did not cease until the last years of the nineteenth century. Their output was extensive, at least 149 windows, and this accounts for most but not all of their glass. Although much glass has survived, virtually no documentation exists for the Beer business and so analysis of this side of their operation has to be

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
Jim Cheshire

THE STAINED-GLASS STUDIO established by Joseph Bell in Bristol presents an ideal case study for this book: many of Bell’s windows survive intact and rare archival information about the firm survives. Joseph Bell’s jobs book covers the period between March 1843 and January 1856 and documents the vast majority of Bell’s output. 1 In addition to the jobs book Joseph Bell’s notebooks have survived

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival