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Roger Singleton-Turner

planned interview length will be) of dummy questions. When rehearsing the wrap, rehearse the final 30 seconds of the programme, again using a dummy final question to each guest. What this system does is to make sure that everything is properly coordinated and that all the elements work, including credit and name captions, if you are using them. All interviews should be conducted as-directed sequences. The Director, Vision Mixer and Camera Operators will react to the discussion as it progresses. It therefore cannot be fully rehearsed. Rehearsing the shots

in Cue and Cut
Abstract only
Roger Singleton-Turner

in the UK rely, in whole or in part, on multi-camera shoots. It is possible to generate complete sequences or whole programmes in a single pass. This is not the same as recording sequences on two or more cameras running independently and then editing the recordings in post-production; the level of co-ordination is different. The necessary elements in multi-camera production are: A vision mixer (switcher) for selecting the images to be recorded or transmitted. There is usually one person (Vision Mixer or Switcher) actually doing the picture selection, though

in Cue and Cut
Roger Singleton-Turner

the vision mixer or switcher, for instance; money and how much time you have, how many cameras there are and so on; the creativity of you and the rest of the team; the strongest and clearest way you can find to put across the heart of the piece; fashion: what’s in and what’s not (the influence here may be subconscious); and received wisdom – the conventions developed over the past century or more, which include dealing with the passage of time, montages, framing and handling sound (leading incoming sound before a change of shot, for instance). A

in Cue and Cut
Roger Singleton-Turner

television. There is more to it than that: factors like the positioning of the cameras, the framing of shots, the angles, the cutting points and the cutting rate can make the audience feel more (or less) involved with what is going on. On well-written and directed studio dramas, I have often felt that the camera and sound crews, the Vision Mixer and the Director as well as the actors are all taking part in the same performance, rather than merely observing. I’ll come back to drama later. Multimedia formats This book focuses on multi-camera video content suitable for

in Cue and Cut
Roger Singleton-Turner

allowed an edit for the start of that sentence, I’d suggest going back at least as far as, ‘It could be the right thing’. While grammatically correct, ‘This, though. . .’ is really the middle of the thought, not the start of it. Allowing the extra few seconds will make performance and the edit much easier! At the start of a retake or a pick-up, the shot on screen should be the first that is actually needed, not the outgoing picture. If you try giving the outgoing shot as well, the edit will only work if the Vision Mixer’s (Switcher’s) reactions are identical to

in Cue and Cut
Abstract only
Roger Singleton-Turner

necessary to get the best shot. With several cameras to deal with, there is always the challenge of keeping them out of each others’ shots, so multi-camera shooting frequently requires a compromise over camera position. Though editing inevitably took longer on single-camera projects, the Editor and Director had far more choice and flexibility in creating the movie. They were not stuck with the Vision Mixer’s ‘edit’, which depended, in part, on his or her own reaction time. It is certainly easier, for instance, to change an actor’s performance by careful editing using

in Cue and Cut
Lez Cooke

Martin, 1964: 28–9) The montage sequence in The Middle Men may have been one of the first attempts to incorporate a form of Eisensteinian montage into television drama – Kennedy Martin also acknowledged the influence of Eisenstein’s montage theories in ‘Nats Go Home’ – but to attempt to achieve this in a live studio drama illustrates the aesthetic ambition of the production. Whether the sequence was actually realised on the day of transmission is a matter for conjecture. It is possible that during the course of the live broadcast the camera operators and vision mixer

in Troy Kennedy Martin
Richard Hewett

crew, and the tendency for the vision mixer to cut between shots on actors’ delivery of their lines –​something that went again Teague’s directorial instincts: 230 For me, it’s about: feel that emotion –​go when you want to know what the person’s saying –​and this goes against everything that these people have been trained [in] … So I’m trying to do this in … forty-​eight hours, trying to convince these people: ‘It’s going to work, it’s going to work.’ And I tell you it was an uphill struggle. It really was, purely because they were, like: ‘But this is the way we

in The changing spaces of television acting
An introduction
Roger Singleton-Turner

essence, the recorded tape was played back. At the right moment, the new action was cued and the Vision Mixer would cut from the source tape to the studio live-action and this would record over the tail of the outgoing recording. Even with audible cues on the tapes, this system required a lot of skill to work properly. Editec, from Ampex, who were then a major supplier of videotape equipment, was also the system by which the 2″ quadruplex tapes could be edited electronically. Alternatively, as the BBC invariably recorded onto two video machines, in case of faults, one

in Cue and Cut
John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan, and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

film cost a lot in the time overrun. He did not want to use the standard television close-up technique which results in most close-ups in any confrontation between characters being filmed three-quarter face in angled shots and instantly edited by the vision-mixer. Anderson’s full-face close-ups inevitably meant that the

in Lindsay Anderson