Search results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 1,058 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Algerian national cinemas
Guy Austin

Currently, Algerian cinema is starting to reconfigure itself after two decades of attrition and collapse. The nationalised film industry of the Boumediene era is long gone, but there are signs that a national film industry might be under (re)construction. Those signs are small-scale. It was taken as significant that the comedy Mascarades (Salem, 2007) was released on as many as eleven screens

in Algerian national cinema
Allison Drew

The Frenchmen who conquered the land now called Algeria were ruthless. Before they arrived, the indigenous Berber people had survived many invasions, from the Phoenicians to the Vandals, the Byzantine and the Arabs, who came in the seventh century bringing Islam. The Berbers adopted Islam but maintained their own language and customs. From the eleventh through to the

in We are no longer in France
Allison Drew

extremely risky, while the indigénat made it illegal for Algerians to join political parties. Yet Algeria’s socialists were optimistic. They could claim that Marx himself had spent a few months in Algeria in 1882 - for health reasons - and that Marx and Engels had written about the French conquest of Algeria. Marx and Engels readily recognised colonialism’s violence and economic devastation, but they did

in We are no longer in France
Abstract only
Dethroning And Exiling Indigenous Monarchs Under British And French Colonial Rule, 1815– 1955
Author: Robert Aldrich

The overthrow and exile of Napoleon in 1815 is a familiar episode in modern history, but it is not well known that just a few months later, British colonisers toppled and banished the last king in Ceylon. This book explores confrontations and accommodations between European colonisers and indigenous monarchs. It discusses the displacement of a few among the three dozen 'potentates' by British and French authorities from 1815 until the 1950s. The complicated relationship between the crown of a colonising country and colonial monarchies has often lain in the background of historical research, but relatively seldom appeared in the forefront except in the case of the Indian princely states. The book further examines particular cases of the deposition and exile of rulers: King Sri Vikrama Rajasinha in Ceylon in 1815, Queen Ranavalona of Madagascar in 1897, and Emperors Ham Nghi, Thanh Thai and Duy Tan in Vietnam during 1885-1916. It also provides more composite accounts of Asia and Africa: the British ouster of Indian princes, the last Burmese king and a sultan in Malaya, and then British and French removal of a host of 'chieftains' in sub-Saharan Africa. Finally, the book looks at the French colonial removal of rulers in Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia - and the restoration of a Moroccan sultan on the eve of decolonisation. By the end of the colonial period, in many countries around the globe, monarchism - kingship, had lost its old potency, though it has not disappeared.

Communists, nationalists and the popular front
Allison Drew

In the 1930s impoverished rural Algerians swarmed into already densely populated urban areas. The traditional medina became both ruralised and Europeanised. The new urbanites maintained tight networks with their rural relatives, linking town and countryside ever more closely. However, urban youth spent more time in the streets by comparison with their parents, congregating at

in We are no longer in France
Abstract only
Representing people of Algerian heritage
Joseph McGonagle

Representing people of ­Algerian heritage 2 Shaping spaces: representing people of ­Algerian heritage French colonial and postcolonial relations with the countries of the Maghreb have been long and troubled. Post-1945, significant numbers of Moroccans, Tunisians and Algerians migrated to France and eventually settled there definitively: they and their families now constitute a significant proportion of France’s ethnic minority population. Aside from being numerically the greatest, arguably the symbolically most important and prominent component of this

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture
Abstract only
Imagining socialism and communism in Algeria
Allison Drew

. While at times the Comintern played a constructive role within its national sections, all too often its efforts to impose uniformity conflicted with local conditions, impeding the efforts of communists to address their own national problems. Algeria is a case in point. This book examines the efforts of communists in French colonial Algeria to imagine the Algerian nation

in We are no longer in France
Abstract only
The spread of French military operations in Algeria, 1954–1958
Martin Thomas

I It is hard to underestimate the political impact within France of the French military operations in Algeria between the initial uprisings in November 1954 and General Charles de Gaulle’s accession to power in May 1958. The Algerian War finally induced the political paralysis of the Fourth Republic which, although implicit in the 1946 constitution, had previously been

in Guardians of empire
The examples of Algeria and Tunisia
Martin Thomas

This chapter discusses forms of public opposition to empire in two North African territories that typified the differing strands of republican imperialism in the inter-war period. Official commitment to assimilationism in Algeria stood in marked contrast to indirect, associationist rule in the Tunisian protectorate. Yet in both locations, integral nationalist

in The French empire between the wars
The integration of authoritarian Algeria in the international system
Francesco Cavatorta

7 From partners to allies: the integration of authoritarian Algeria in the international system The research findings support the contention that the international dimension played a significant role in the origin, development and conclusion of the failed Algerian transition. In particular, a set of coinciding interests between key domestic and international constituencies was decisive in ending an electoral process that would have seen the establishment of a FIS-led government. The process of democratisation might have ended even if the FIS had been allowed to

in The international dimension of the failed Algerian transition