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Gervase Rosser

’s Lynn , Records of Social and Economic History, new series, IX, Oxford: Oxford University Press for the British Academy, 1984, pp. 117–19. Latin, transl. by the editor. Reproduced by permission of the British Academy. This is the agreement made between the mayor and community of the town of Lynn, on the one part, and the prior and convent of the Augustinian friars of Lynn, on the other, that

in Towns in medieval England
Andrew Rabin

II HOMILIES AND HOMILETIC TRACTS This homily, likely the earliest surviving example of an address by Wulfstan to the royal council, survives only in London, British Library, Cotton Tiberius A.iii. Two possible dates have been proposed for its composition: Jost raises the possibility that it may have served as an address to open legal deliberations

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
Gervase Rosser

’être. Shrewsbury, Shropshire County Record Office, MS. 356/321 (a); Norwich, Norfolk Record Office, King’s Lynn MSS KL/C38/1–31 (b); British Library, MS. Egerton 2886 (c); Wisbech Town Museum, MS Records of the Guild of Holy Trinity 1379–1547 (d). Latin, transl. by GR. (a) The palmers’ guild of Ludlow [Rent-collectors’ accounts, 1364

in Towns in medieval England
Andrew Rabin

III SOURCES AND ANALOGUES This homily survives in three manuscripts: Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 201, Oxford, Bodleian Library, Junius 121, and London, British Library, Cotton Nero A.i. Pons-Sanz, dates the text to Wulfstan’s London episcopacy on linguistic grounds, yet both Bethurum and Wormald view it as a more mature composition, possibly produced in the years

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
Gervase Rosser

the murder of Janus Imperial’, Journal of British Studies , XXXV, 1996, pp. 1–23. 21 Revelation 2.9. 22 A reference to the Peasants’ Revolt in June 1381. 23 For what

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Andrew Rabin

. This text, to which the manuscript gives the title Concerning Sanctuary and Protection, survives only in London, British Library, Cotton Nero A.i. Although paired in the manuscript with a selection of similarly-themed clauses from VIII Æthelred, Sanctuary ’s nostalgia for an idealised legal past, interest in social mobility, and praise for the ‘wise

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

–307. 7 C. M. Barron and A. Sutton (eds), Medieval London Widows 1300–1500 , London, 1994 ; M. K. McIntosh, ‘The benefits and drawbacks of femme sole status in England, 1300–1630’, Journal of British Studies , XLIV, 2005, pp. 410–38; B. A. Hanawalt, The Wealth of Wives: Women, Law, and Economy in Late Medieval London , Oxford, 2007, esp. p

in Towns in medieval England
T. J. H. McCarthy

–16. 173 Cf. Ibid . 7.21, p. 516. 174 The tomb was destroyed by fire in 1808. A seventeenth-century cutaway drawing is extant: Vicenzo Favi, Relatione del viaggio di Gerusalemme , MS London, British Library, Add. 33566, fol. 90r; reproduced in Hallam (1989) , p. 107

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest
Abstract only
Stephen Penn

’s Death , translated by Mary F. Rousseau (Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 1968), p. 59. 61 Manichaeism, which originated with the Persian Gnostic theologian Mani in the second half of the third century CE , posited two Gods, one good and the other evil. Mani’s ideas influenced Augustine, who wrote in some detail about them before finally rejecting them. Pelagianism, named after the British or possibly Irish theologian Pelagius (fl. early fifth century CE ), established the principle that any individual could make progress towards

in John Wyclif
Abstract only
Thirteenth-century exempla from the British Isles
Author:

Exempla, the stories with which preachers enlivened their sermons and impressed salutary moral lessons on their hearers, have long been appreciated as a source of key importance for medieval history. They played an important part in popular preaching and yet, for all the work being published on preaching and on the mendicant orders more generally, little of the abundant primary material is available in English translation. This book presents translation material from two collections of exempla assembled in the British Isles in the last quarter of the thirteenth century. One, the Liber Exemplorum (LE), was compiled by an English Franciscan working in Ireland. The other, probably the work of an English Dominican based in Cambridge (DC), is represented by fifty-two stories, about one-sixth of the total. These two collections are important because they are among the earliest to survive from the British Isles. Their short, pithy narratives are not limited to matters of Church doctrine and practice, but touch on a wide range of more mundane matters and provide vivid snapshots of medieval life in the broadest sense. The first part of the collection is chiefly devoted to Christ and the Virgin, the Mass and the saving power of the Cross. The second part has exempla on a wide variety of doctrinal, moral and other topics. These include the vices, the virtues, the sacraments and church practice, and the sins and other failings thought to beset particular professions or groups.