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Diana Donald

in the romantic period, countering the negative stereotype of female animality. Other examples can be found in the early poems of Wordsworth recalling his childhood, such as ‘To a butterfly’, written in 1802. When he and his sister ran after a butterfly A very hunter did I rush Upon the prey: –​with leaps and springs I follow’d on from brake to bush; But She, God love her! feared to brush The dust from off its wings.14 •  20  • Sexual distinctions in attitudes to animals Masculine boldness and activity, feminine sweetness and compassion, were now supposedly

in Women against cruelty (revised edition)
A gendered divide in Victorian society
Diana Donald

. In ‘Sylvia and the blackbird’, Sylvia deters a rough village boy from birds-​nesting, and finally enrols him in the Band of Mercy. In ‘The merciless boy; or, “Oh! don’t, don’t, brother John” ’, mother and sister both remonstrate with John for torturing a butterfly –​‘ “It was God’s butterfly” ’.88 The battle for boys’ souls could, alternatively, be waged by a system of antitypes:  cruel boys are constantly set against kind boys, often on facing pages. In ‘Robert the stone-​thrower’, a boy stones birds on his way to church, and is duly admonished by his mother, but

in Women against cruelty
Diana Donald

, countering the negative stereotype of female animality. Other examples can be found in the early poems of Wordsworth recalling his childhood, such as ‘To a butterfly’, written in 1802. When he and his sister ran after a butterfly A very hunter did I rush Upon the prey: –​with leaps and springs •  20  • Sexual distinctions in attitudes to animals I follow’d on from brake to bush; But She, God love her! feared to brush The dust from off its wings.14 Masculine boldness and activity, feminine sweetness and compassion, were now supposedly complementary qualities of the

in Women against cruelty
Abstract only
The British monarchy in Australia, New Zealand and Canada, 1991–2016
Mark McKenna

Canada, New Zealand or Australia to become republics. Rather, it is the electoral fear that can easily be created around proposals for constitutional change, fear that results in what Canadian historian Michael Bliss has rightly described as the constitutional ‘inertia factor’. 30 Hence, Tony Abbott’s mischievous warning that ‘in the same way that the beating of butterflies’ wings is said to have

in Crowns and colonies
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Robin W. Winks and James R. Rush

conflict between generations, between (Asian) tradition and (Western-driven but also Asian) modernity. But as Embree points out, many of the older interpretations of Asia survive, indeed still thrive, in these modern stories. Now, however, the old cliches may cut many ways. In the play M. Butterfly (1988) by David Hwang, a Chinese-American playwright, the classic tragedy of an East-West love affair

in Asia in Western fiction
Abstract only
Jan Broadway

educated people throughout Europe gained greater spatial awareness of their own localities and the wider world. Across Europe emergent nation-states sought to recover their national histories and to link them to a classical past; and they did this co-operatively, knowing about and assisting the endeavours of fellow scholars in other countries. However, while the contributory factors were common and historical research co-operative across national boundaries, the precise conditions within which they operated were different. The butterfly effect of chaos theory may be

in ‘No historie so meete’
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Dividing the spoils
Henrietta Lidchi and Stuart Allan

British Museum and the British Library. 7 NMS, A.1903.209. 8 Current research has located a number of these cups in regimental museums. 9 Evidenced because the sandals he also donated (NMS, A.1893.216) have a price attached and appear to have been new at the time of purchase. See also E. Talbot Rice and M. Harding, Butterflies and Bayonets: The Soldier as Collector (London: NAM, 1989). 10 The gift is recognised in the annual report of activities in 1893, but the collection is not cited in guidebooks of the early twentieth century, though other military

in Dividing the spoils
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

Sapper Arthur Richards wondered how this ‘beautiful green bush’ with its ‘magnificently coloured birds and butterflies’ and an abundance of cocoa nuts, oranges, figs and other fruits could be so unhealthy. 23 Soldiers and sailors were mightily impressed by the organisation on their behalf, particularly the regular supplies of food (1lb of preserved beef, 1lb of biscuit, tea, sugar and rice each day

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Emma Gleadhill

. 22 Instead of recording her observations in front of the learned gentlemen, Dorothy felt obliged to put her notebook away within the institutional space of the museum. She also restricted herself to viewing ‘a very large collection of butterflies, moths, beetles’, ‘an extremely beautiful and valuable collection of shells’ and an Egyptian mummy rather than the anatomical specimens. 23

in Taking travel home
Exhibitions and festivals
Jeffrey Richards

concert, conducted by Edward German, included his Welsh Rhapsody and Walford Davies’s Festal Overture. The Country Dance from Harry Evans’s cantata Dafydd ap Gwilym was conducted by the composer and ‘was very successful’. The final Empire concert, New Zealand, was conducted by Sir Frederic Cowen. The programme included his own Butterfly’s Ball overture and the second suite of English

in Imperialism and music