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Entrepreneurs and professionals
John Herson

with Irish compatriots and their work in a Church with roots in the English Catholic community. The Gibson family: from Ulster to the mayoral chamber Hugh Woods Gibson was the most ‘successful’ Irish immigrant to settle in nineteenth-century Stafford. His case demonstrates that religious links between Ulster and England could play a significant role in establishing Protestant immigrants in the host economy, but it also cautions against making simple assumptions about the attitudes and behaviour patterns inculcated by an Ulster Presbyterian background. Gibson and his

in Divergent paths
Gabriel Glickman

planned overthrow of the Test Act. However, the trajectory taking English Catholics towards the bitter indictments delivered in 1689 was longer and larger. The depth of disenchantment with the Anglican leadership can be explained by the fact that for over two decades recusant authors had identified a new affinity with the Restoration church as an essential stepping-stone in the campaign for greater accommodation within the life of

in The later Stuart Church, 1660–1714
James E. Kelly

the sake of Catholic survival. Collaboration with the English colleges In 1568, William Allen capitalised on the sizeable English Catholic diaspora following the Elizabethan ‘purges’ at Oxford and Cambridge to found Douai college. While gaining a reputation as the first Tridentine seminary, it was more pointedly the first institutional outlet for English Catholic religious life following Chambers_O’Connor_Printer.indd 198 08/09/2017 09:53 ENGLISH WOMEN RELIGIOUS IN COUNTER-REFORMATION 199 Elizabeth I’s accession and the return of the state to a position of

in College communities abroad
Ulrike Ehret

and politics, so that ‘Christianity must rule the Jews, or the Jews will misrule and plunder the Christians’.19 The call to strengthen Christian values in the modern age and the call to convert the Jews were the most common solutions offered in English Catholic newspapers. Writers also agreed that the ‘Jewish question’ was not a question of reversing emancipation.20 A similar line was drawn whenever solutions would imply violence and vulgar hatred of the Jew as a Jew. 02-ChurchNationRace_036-093 42 28/11/11 14:40 Page 42 Church, nation and race The Witness

in Church, nation and race
Bryan Fanning

, Benson had imagined a future world dominated since 1917 by socialism, freemasonry and secular science. In this future, England had assented to Catholic home rule in Ireland and encouraged its Catholic population to emigrate there. Catholicism had declined everywhere except in Rome and in Ireland where appearances of a woman in blue were reported at Marian shrines.1 The ideas behind Benson’s respective utopia and dystopia were in keeping with wider Catholic intellectual responses to the threat of modernity. English Catholics like Benson and Hillaire Belloc viewed the

in Are the Irish different?
Were they too good for them?
Thomas Bartlett

situation of Irish Catholics may not have been all that bad. The penal laws against English Catholics lasted longer (they were always ‘behind’ Irish Catholics where repeal of the laws was concerned) and were much tougher – they had to pay a double land tax, for example: while French laws against the Huguenots were quite draconian. Finally, it has been argued that even if there had been no penal laws against Irish Catholics the profile and composition of the governing class in the eighteenth century would not have been much altered. So calamitous had been the collapse in

in Irish Catholic identities
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Macbeth and the Jesuits
Richard Wilson

rush, in the wake of the Plot, to displace guilt from English Catholics onto the Jesuits, whose mission had been fired by that peripatetic relic of Campion’s thumb. It is the symbolic equivalent of the arms-length strategy adopted by court Catholics such as the Howard family, three of whose members sat on the Bench at Garnet’s trial; or by tame clerics like the Archpriest George Blackwell, who urged the laity to take the Oath of Allegiance, imposed in 1606 deliberately to prise ‘his Majesty’s subjects that adhere in their hearts to the popish religion’ away from ‘the

in The Lancashire witches
Author: Brian Sudlow

This book is a comparative study of the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, this book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes which are considered to be emblematic of the Catholic literature.

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William Sheils

participating in a wider endeavour of the poetic imagination which, faced with the upheavals of industrial revolution at home and political revolution abroad, sought a realignment of the religious foundations of society.13 It was in Southey, however, that the impulse to defend the Church was most clearly seen, and he embarked on the writing of two broadly historical works which would set out his political, social and ecclesiastical agenda. The publication in 1818 of The End of Religious Controversy, a learned defence of the loyalty of English Catholics and the truth of their

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain
Theology, politics, and Newtonian public science

This book explores at length the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, the book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes that are considered to be emblematic of Catholic literature. Its breadth will make it a useful guide for students wishing to become familiar with a wide range of such writings in France and England during this period.