Search results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 85 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Alison Phipps

9781526147172 PRINT.indd 109 14/01/2020 13:18 Me, not you be led by angry women’.2 This was partly based on a nationally representative survey conducted in 2016 by PerryUndem, which found that anger over Trump’s sexism had done more than anything else to spur people to political action. To understand the Women’s March, Goldberg explained, one had to understand ‘just how devastated, shocked, and even traumatized many women [were] by the election of the grab-’em-by-the-pussy president’. The march, followed by the viral spread of #MeToo later that year, led to 2017 being

in Me, not you
A feminist debate in internet time
Shilpa Phadke

interviews anonymously to protect people’s identity. This chapter focuses on feminist arguments, disagreements and solidarities in the wake of #MeToo rather than on the debates surrounding sexual harassment itself, which are addressed in other chapters in this book. I attempt to think thorough what it means to have an argument in internet time. What does it mean then to engage as feminists with each other in the online space? What are the specific pressures and anxieties produced by articulations and disagreements in

in Intimacy and injury
Marc James Léger

Das Kapital Oratorio to the political limits of the Black Lives Matter and MeToo movements as forms of ‘victim politics.’ In contrast to Simon Critchley’s notion of an ‘ethics of commitment’ and Nizan Shaked’s particularist and identity-based approach to conceptual art’s ‘synthetic proposition,’ I draw on Marxist theory in order to better appreciate the limits of postmodern pluralism as a means to confront the problems of global capitalism. Prole art threat Judith Butler’s notion of the performative

in Vanguardia
Anu Koivunen, Katariina Kyrölä, and Ingrid Ryberg

 1 1 VULNERABILITY AS A POLITICAL LANGUAGE A nu Koi v une n, K atar iina K yröl ä a nd I ngr id  Ry berg I n present-​ day public discussions, questions of power, agency, and the media are debated more intensely than ever as issues of injury or empowerment. Vulnerability has emerged as a key concept circulating in these discussions and their academic analyses. The #MeToo campaign, as well as its extensions like #TimesUp and versions in various languages across the globe, has been taken up as a key example of these tendencies, showing how the public

in The power of vulnerability
Abstract only
Alison Phipps

#MeToo listened to and learned from the Black women, both trans and cis, at the forefront of prison abolition? Or if activists against sexual harassment in universities and other institutions joined forces with sex workers’ unions and organisations supporting migrant labourers? What would a c­ ampaign  against trafficking look like, if it was also a campaign against borders? What would a campaign against sexual exploitation look like, if it was also a campaign against the exploitation of nature? How might we put the fight against sexual violence alongside battles for

in Me, not you
Abstract only
Valerie Bryson

protests have developed into national movements which in turn have fed into and drawn strength from campaigns in other countries; here the most obvious example is the way that apparently separate protests against sexual violence in Argentina, India and elsewhere have become linked into the #MeToo movement that began in the US. Developments in social media have of course provided unprecedented opportunities for making connections and giving a voice to a much wider range of women than in the past (although it should be remembered that many women in poor countries lack

in The futures of feminism
Where are the male victims?
Louise du Toit

’n Oop hol is in die tronk soos ’n goudmyn – álmal soek ’n stukkie. (An open anus in prison is like a gold mine – everybody wants a piece of it.) (Sesant, 2020 ) Under conditions of increased visibility of sexual violence crimes and victims speaking out, such as during the #MeToo and #SayHerName campaigns, patriarchal logic tends to change tack. No longer able to either deny its reality – or extent 1 – altogether (its first strategy) or to

in Intimacy and injury
Abstract only
The trouble with mainstream feminism
Author: Alison Phipps

What violence can we do, in the name of fighting sexual violence? This book presents a critique of #MeToo and similar Anglo-American campaigns. These campaigns are dominated by self-described ‘nasty women’, who refuse to be silent and compliant and who name and shame perpetrators in the media. These women also tend to be privileged and white. The book argues that mainstream feminism filters righteous anger about gender inequality through race and class supremacy. This turns ‘me, too’ into ‘me, not you’: an exclusive focus on white women’s pain and protection, and a desire for power and control sated through criminal punishment or institutional discipline. Punitive systems tend to disproportionately target marginalised people, who become collateral damage of the white feminist ‘war machine’. It is also a short step from sacrificing marginalised people to seeing them as enemies, which happens in campaigns against the sex industry and transgender inclusion. In this reactionary feminism, ‘me, not you’ refers to hoarding resources, policing borders and shutting doors. The book concludes that to tackle these dynamics white feminists need to reach towards a more intersectional, connected and abolition-focused politics, taking their lead from feminists of colour and other marginalised people.

Abstract only
Alison Phipps

Chapter 2 Me, not you In 2006 Black feminist Tarana Burke created an organisation to help survivors of sexual violence, particularly young women of colour, find pathways to healing. Reflecting her central principle of empowerment through empathy, Burke named her programme of work ‘Me Too’. In 2017 the phrase went viral as a hashtag, following allegations against film producer Harvey Weinstein by a number of famous women in Hollywood. ‘If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted,’ tweeted Alyssa Milano, ‘write “me too” as a reply to this tweet.’ #MeToo is

in Me, not you
Abstract only
Alison Phipps

Chapter 3 Political whiteness As #MeToo unfolded, perhaps second only to Harvey Weinstein in its cast of antagonists was gymnastics coach Larry Nassar.1 In what is now called the ‘USA gymnastics sex abuse scandal’, Nassar was accused of molesting at least 250 girls and young women and one young man, between 1992 and 2016. In 2017 Nassar was sentenced to 60 years in federal prison after pleading guilty to child pornography charges. On 24 January 2018 he was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in a Michigan state prison after pleading guilty to seven counts of sexual

in Me, not you