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Doctors and medics in the Vietnam War
Carol Acton and Jane Potter

6 Crying silently : doctors and medics in the Vietnam War In his Second World War memoir, The Other Side of Time, American battalion surgeon Brendan Phibbs writes: ‘We were lucky in 1942. We didn’t have to shrink from pictures of screaming Vietnamese about to be raped and murdered by American soldiers at My Lai. There were no dead students scattered across the grass at Kent State. Where we stood in 1942 the air was charged, clean, dangerous, honest.’1 While our discussion of the Second World War, and Phibbs’s own book, shows that the air was not as ‘clean

in Working in a world of hurt
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Children born of war: lessons learnt?
Sabine Lee

Epilogue Children born of war: lessons learnt? CBOW are a global phenomenon. It is likely that the scale of this phenomenon will never be fully comprehended, as there are many reasons that account for the fact that data about children fathered by foreign soldiers and born to local mothers will remain inaccurate and incomplete. Despite this reservation with regard to exact figures, the analysis of the chosen case studies – the Second World War and its post-war occupations, the Vietnam War, the Bosnian Wars, sub-Saharan African conflicts and UN peacekeeping

in Children born of war in the twentieth century
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Women in the Vietnam War
Carol Acton and Jane Potter

5 Claiming trauma: women in the Vietnam War The Vietnam Women’s Memorial in Washington, DC is an isolated island of suffering (Figure  5.1). Placed at a distance from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial – the Wall– and the ‘Three Soldiers’ statue, it exists outside these more traditionally masculine commemorative narratives of war: the warrior and the dead (see Figures 5.2 and 5.3). Instead, it depicts the women’s war story, particularly that of the nurse. She is locked forever in the moment of holding the dying soldier – a pietà in which there is no redemption

in Working in a world of hurt
At war in Vietnam
Alice Garner and Diane Kirkby

countries to sign up to the Fulbright Program were in the Asia-​Pacific region –​China, Burma, the Philippines, Australia and New Zealand. By the mid-​1960s twenty-​seven countries across the world had signed agreements but only Australia and New Zealand among the western nations now joined the United States in fighting the Vietnam War. Their goal was to secure the defence of their region.8 Under the Menzies government, Australia became the United States’ keenest ally in Vietnam, actively and uncritically supporting military intervention in the hope of retaining a strong

in Academic ambassadors, Pacific allies
An introduction
Sabine Lee

children born of the post-war occupations of Germany and Austria vary widely and are believed to be at least 200,000 and 20,000 respectively;17 similarly approximations of children born of American GIs and local Vietnamese women during the Vietnam War, generally biracial and many of mixed black/Asian descent, range from 40,00018 to 200,000.19 More recently, conflicts in East Timor, Cambodia and Sri Lanka are believed to have led to the birth of thousands of children conceived of liaisons between military personnel and local women.20 The Balkan Wars of the 1990s, with

in Children born of war in the twentieth century
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Angela K. Smith

testimonies come from the women’s branches of the armed services. But, Bennett argues, military status was not necessary; the Battle of the Atlantic was all-encompassing. However, in the later years of the twentieth century the numbers of women in the military seem to have grown. Chapter 9 illustrates the confusion often experienced by women in the Vietnam War. They could be soldiers in the armies of either the

in Gender and warfare in the twentieth century
1960s ex-radicals
Ashley Lavelle

chapter 2 ‘Turn on, tune in, drop out’ … drop back in: 1960s ex-radicals1 The decade of the 1960s was one of heightened radical political activity in crucial centres of capital accumulation (Horowitz, 1968: v).2 The Vietnam War, in particular, provided the impetus for the explosion of anti-capitalist campaigns across the Western world (Callinicos, 1994: 63). The period saw the emergence of a ‘new left’, whose ideology centred around personal liberation, participatory democracy, anti-racism and anti-sexism, direct action, community decision-making, and

in The politics of betrayal
Joseph Heller

commitment to the region was, taking into consideration that its resources were being drained by the Vietnam War. 4 There was a significant discrepancy between Israel’s priorities and those of the Johnson administration. Walt Rostow felt the various Ba’ath factions were vying for power, bringing anarchy to the regime, and Egypt would not go to war without Syria. Thus, it was difficult for the US administration

in The United States, the Soviet Union and the Arab– Israeli conflict, 1948– 67
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Family, gender and post-colonial issues in three Vietnam War texts
Marion Gibson

is exporting his domestic troubles to Vietnam. 13 Susan Jeffords, writing in the late 1980s, said that ‘Vietnam [war] representation is only topically “about” the war in Vietnam … Its true subject is the masculine response to changes in gender relations in recent decades, its real battle that of the masculine to dominate and overpower its “enemy” – the feminine.’ 14 Coetzee’s story makes a similar

in Gender and warfare in the twentieth century
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The Korean War in popular memory, 1953– 2014
Grace Huxford

. Neither did the low level of opposition it inspired make it a notorious war, like the Vietnam War later became. Nor did the war form a major bulwark in British post-​war identity and culture: aside from re-​ runs of M*A*S*H, the Korean War rarely featured on British television in the latter half of the twentieth century. The most famous fictional veteran of the conflict –​the haphazard hotelier Basil Fawlty –​was renowned for reasons other than his military service.5 Korea was neither lauded nor vilified in British culture and it sank into relative cultural obscurity

in The Korean War in Britain