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Democratic conflict and the public university
Ruth Sheldon

knowledge and the life world (Delanty 2001). As a consequence, in this book, I frame the university both as a Contested framings 29 historically situated microcosm for the working out of broader democratic tensions in British society and as an institution with an identity at stake in this politics. As the bearer of cultural values and as a socially embedded public institution, the contemporary university has been profoundly shaped by, and implicated with, the transformations of modernity. As Gerard Delanty (2001) has argued, the roots of the contemporary idea of the

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics
Open Access (free)
Johan Östling

sociological functional analysis. In line with the pace of increasing scientific specialisation, he saw a need for a division of the university’s functions; but as an institution it had instead amassed even more functions. There was now considerable discrepancy between the idea of the university and the tasks that it actually performed. The various sectors developed their own goals, which were never merged into a common, coherent ideal for the university.51 When Schelsky himself endeavoured to formulate a vision for the contemporary university, he found inspiration in the

in Humboldt and the modern German university
Marcel Stoetzle

much more puzzling, sometimes irritating ‘negative dialectics’ (the title of his most important theoretical work), which refuses to satisfy or to instruct. The text is designed to be a strange, awkward thing that provides food for thought more than ‘instruction’ (quite like a modern artwork, or perhaps a prose poem). An essay by Adorno would be marked down seriously if it was handed in by a student at a contemporary university: no introduction that sets out clearly what he is about to do, no section headings that make it nice and easy to follow the steps of the

in Beginning classical social theory
Mark Bould

of ‘inorganic intellectuals’ 41 terrified of capitalism's imminent demise in the face of socialism, anti-colonial struggle and the ‘long down-turn’ of late capitalism, 42 rather than depicting it as a fully formed counterrevolution that sprang into existence and transformed everything with the 1978–80 ascendances of Deng Xiaoping, Thatcher and Reagan. Then, noting the tendency for writers such as Brown and Giroux to focus on the contemporary university as a key site for the production of the neoliberal subjectivity they decry, McClanahan historicises human

in The films of Costa-Gavras
Thomas Docherty

latter, those various blocks to democratic freedom, identified here with a totalitarian State, have come to dominate and to shape the contemporary University on ‘our’ side of the Wall or Curtain just as much as on the other. Of course, to say such a thing is to invite disbelief: obviously, we do not work under tyrannical authoritarianism; obviously, we are free to speak out and have a full academic freedom that allows us to criticize our own institutions and their leaderships; obviously, we are not opposed to the common people in any way. To that, all I might say here

in The new treason of the intellectuals
The claim of reason
Ruth Sheldon

this melodrama in the context of circulating anxieties over the threats posed by dangerous ideologies to the academy. The pressures of these dominant political discourses help to explain the timing of the boycott debate. Yet this also raises a broader question about the sources of these anxieties:  why has concern with extremism and anti-​racism become so prominent in relation to contemporary universities? In responding to this question, it is important to first situate tensions over ‘extremism’ and ‘Islamophobia’ within the broader historical context of

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics
Sivamohan Valluvan

-confessed radical cultural theory that desires only to genuflect at the altar of inclusion and tolerance. Scruton’s is a brand of conservative muscularity that now operates under the banner of safeguarding pure knowledge from the levelling excesses of ‘political correctness’ and ‘identity politics’. But also apparent in some of the quieter moments of Scruton’s sweeping argument is a grievance against contemporary universities’ deference to business schools and the general flurry of management mantras that epitomise the ‘new spirit of capitalism’. 8 Much of this general lament

in The clamour of nationalism
Daniel Weinbren

illustrated by the editor of the Times Educational Supplement, who in 1971 called it ‘England’s Open University’.68 Although the OU’s administrative structures and its Charter and Statutes had much in common with other contemporary universities, its regional organisation was unique, as was the influence that regions had on its policy. It was intended that a General Assembly, representative of both students and staff, would elect representatives to the Council and Senate through regional assemblies. The Planning Committee set out the aims as first to ensure as far as

in The Open University
Open Access (free)
Johan Östling

, ‘Bolognaprocessen ett ramverk att fylla’, Svenska Dagbladet, 16 May 2007 and Ash, ‘Humboldt the Undead’, p. 89. 218 Humboldt and the modern German university shaped Humboldt. This was precisely the reason why he could keep an ironic distance to the many genuflections and bows before the Prussian educational reformer. This did not prevent him from personally dealing with the Humboldtian tradition in his analysis of what was wrong with the contemporary university. Hörisch argued that something wholly fundamental in the classic German research university had been lost: students

in Humboldt and the modern German university
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Towards ethical ethnography
Ruth Sheldon

carries a particular potency within 42 Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics contemporary universities, insofar as they are shaped by norms of altruistic self-​ denial and a Kantian emphasis on epistemic and moral universalism (Seidler 2007b). Furthermore, this suspicion of excessive egoism is not limited to positivist approaches. Rather, it also been sustained by post-​structuralism’s critical emphasis on the ways in which theoretical discourses construct their objects, which has displaced sociological approaches attentive to lived experiences (Back 2007; Lynch 2012

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics