Search results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 33 items for :

  • "decolonization" x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Andrew Patrizio

Even recent publications in which a long list of specific practices is discussed, such as Malcolm Miles’s Eco-Aesthetics (2014) or T. J. Demos’s Decolonizing Nature (2016), rightly resist any temptation to become an advocate for ‘eco-art, eco-writing or eco-architecture’, 63 but rather set some art historical contexts for the discussion of artwork that embodies ‘evocation and integrity’. 64 I have applied the same logic in not making curatorial projects the main focus of study, despite, of course, the implicit influence that curatorial work exerts on my

in The ecological eye
Patricia Allmer

:3 (June 2001), 358–78 ; 361. 10 Regula Ludi, ‘What’s so special about Switzerland? Wartime memory as a national ideology in the cold war era’, in Richard Ned Lebow, Wulf Kansteiner, and Claudio Fogu (eds), The Politics of Memory in Postwar Europe (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2006) , pp. 210–48; pp. 233, 234. 11 Michael Rothberg, Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization (Stanford

in The traumatic surreal
Abstract only
Engaging nostalgia
Ali Mozaffari and Nigel Westbrook

broader historical conditions arising from the interaction between Western powers and Asian and Muslim societies since the mid-nineteenth century.80 Aydin has identified the roots of anti-Westernism in Asia as a reaction to the ‘legitimacy crisis of a single, globalized, international system … [rooted in] ­nineteenth-century globalization, imperialism, and decolonization’, in response to which strands of pan-Asian and pan-Islamic thought were formulated.81 Driven by a desire for development, and membership of a global and equitable modern community of nations, the

Abstract only
The international congresses of architecture in Iran and the transnational search for identity
Ali Mozaffari and Nigel Westbrook

culturally appropriate alternatives to normative models of modernist architecture, housing, and urbanism, and in this decolonizing period, the need to recognize the validity of multiple forms of modernity.22 The Iran congresses, therefore, form a missing link connecting the CIAM and Team Ten debates over the meaning of ‘habitat’ to the Vancouver Declaration on Human Settlements at the 1976 United Nations Conference on Human Settlements, in Vancouver, Canada.23 A core contribution to this declaration was a document prepared by delegates from the 1974 Persepolis congress

Abstract only
Belonging
Alpesh Kantilal Patel

around us’.24 Importantly, Jones insists on the identificatory aspects of affect in theorizing the encounter with an artwork that she notes both art historians Simon O’Sullivan and Jan Verwoert abstract.25 She powerfully argues that: What is missing … is a sense of the alignment between the development of the possibility of thinking the rhizome … and what I am arguing to be among the crucial pressures that assisted in … the shattering of the … conventional perspectival system and the model of the subject it subtended and proposed: the decolonization of the so

in Productive failure
Abstract only
Staging art and Chineseness
Jane Chin Davidson

addition to its traditional location in Kassel. The political scene for curators and directors of biennials and triennials is usually connected in some way to issues of global capitalism. And as a decolonizing process, the historical premise of the global exposition enables organizers of biennials/ triennials to utilize its inherent organizing principles, symbolism, and nationalist signifiers to serve a new political advantage. In summary, the five chapters of this book define the concept of Chineseness through the study of bodily-oriented artists in video works that

in Staging art and Chineseness
(eco)feminist interpellations of Chineseness in the work of Yuk King Tan, Cao Fei, and Wu Mali
Jane Chin Davidson

experience for the viewer. The same use of the video installation method was exemplified in the Stories of Women from Hsin-Chuang (1997) (see plate 15). For this project, Wu was not simply narrating the stories by female workers who had left their farming villages after finishing elementary school to work in textile factories. Instead, her Stories are layered montages of image, sound, text, and frames in the deconstructionist ideal that Minh-ha had also adopted with great success in the late 1980s. Always aware of the need to ‘decolonize’ the social and human sciences

in Staging art and Chineseness
Jane Chin Davidson

Donadio, ‘German Art Exhibition Documental Expands into Athens,’ New York Times (5 April 2017), C1. 77 H.G. Masters, ‘Documenta 14, Kassel (Part 2),’ Art Asia Pacific (9 June 2017), http://artasiapacific.com/Blog/Documenta14KasselPart2 (accessed 10 September 2017). 78 James Clifford, The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth-Century Ethnography, Literature, and Art (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988). 79 Anthony Hall, Earth into Property: Colonization, Decolonization, and Capitalism (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2017), 54. 80 Paige Raibmon

in Staging art and Chineseness
The challenge of a globalising world
Caroline Turner and Jen Webb

 Hong Kong Case (Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2011), p. 11. 74 Sussman, Return Migration and Identity, p. 18. 75 Marsha Meskimmon, ‘The Precarious Ecologies of Cosmopolitanism’, in Turner, Antoinette and Stanhope (eds), The World and World-Making in Art, pp. 27–45. 76 This was not the case in 1967, when as a result of industrial abuse there was a major workers’ strike that developed into riots and bombings. See Oscar Ho Hing-kay, ‘China:  The Process of Decolonization in the Case of Hong Kong’, in Philipp Gassert and Martin Klimke (eds), 1968 Memories and

in Art and human rights
Abstract only
Nizan Shaked

fall” is a more specific historic phenomenon, emerging first in the Western democracies in the late 1960s. This timing is important, for it helps us situate multiculturalism in relation to larger social transformations of the postwar era.”17 Kymlicka saw multiculturalism as part of the broader human rights project, which came in so-called waves: 1) the struggle for decolonization, concentrated in the period 1948–65; 2) the struggles against racial segregation and discrimination, initiated and exemplified by the African-American Civil rights movement from 1955 to 1965

in The synthetic proposition