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Dreams and the dreamlike in Pose (2019)
Lydia Ayame Hiraide

oppression which considers ‘trauma as the direct result of systemic forces (e.g., heterosexism and discrimination), as well as transgenerational systems of oppression (e.g., children of those who have experienced racism)’ ( 2017 : 1). Through this lens of ecosystemic oppression, I consider intersectional oppression as a source of substantial trauma for marginalised communities who live at the precarious interstices of structural

in Dreams and atrocity
Abstract only
E.J. Clery
and
Robert Miles

which to sharpen our faculty of discrimination, but it answers none of the legitimate purposes of history. From these considerations it follows that the noblest and most excellent species of history, may be decided to be a composition in which, with a scanty substratum of facts and dates, the writer interweaves a number of happy, ingenious and instructive inventions, blending them into one continuous and

in Gothic documents
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Fred Botting

. Horror, in the formulas and narrative apparatus it depends upon and in the effects it produces, begins to manifest the popular emergence of a different kind of subject, a subject that while always shadowing the higher forms of cultural being as an appetitive, sensation-seeking creature without rational or moral discrimination, testifies to the recent prevalence of ideas of luxurious or wasteful

in Limits of horror
Fred Botting

period in which commerce was assuming a leading role; in stories’ accounts of multiple losses of reason, morality, sense, family, honour; in readers’ lack of discrimination and virtue, tensions in social and familial life are evinced. Duty, law and restraint all seem to disappear in the reading of modern romances: pleasure comes to the fore in the enjoyment of wild, fantastic adventures and tumultuous

in Limits of horror
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Costume, performance and power in 1953
Lisa Mullen

mime aesthetic shares the kind of snobbish disdain for everyday things that Barbara Jones wanted to contest in Black Eyes and Lemonade . The silent theatre attempts to frame the world according to the discriminations of a ‘sophisticated’ eye which supposedly sees past the clutter and squalor that obscures the realm of platonic idealism. In contrast, like Jones, Jake is alert to the gothic energy that these abject and unruly objects harness in order to resist demotion from the zone of visibility. When he spends the night in the crowded prop room, he is disturbed by

in Mid-century gothic
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

educational opportunities than black Africans, the downside was that they were tutored in self-contempt through their greater exposure to a culture systemising racial discrimination. 91 Furthermore, they were perceived as having a corrupting influence, partly connected to the nature of their illegitimacy. Mary Shelley refers in disparaging terms to the mixed race of Alessandro de’ Medici, the Renaissance Duke of Florence, known

in Dangerous bodies
William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft and the perils of the present
Jonathan Dent

neither of these historians ‘experience ... emotions nor excite them’ and that their historical writings are only ‘of use as a whetstone upon which to sharpen our faculty of discrimination’ ( 2000 , 460–2). 27 In Political Justice , Godwin contends that the ‘complete reformation that is wanted, is not

in Sinister histories
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E.J. Clery
and
Robert Miles

often discoloured by passion, or deformed by wickedness. If the world be promiscuously described, I cannot see of what use it can be to read the account; or why it may not be as safe to turn the eye immediately upon mankind, as upon a mirror which shows all that presents itself without discrimination. It is therefore not a sufficient vindication of a character, that it is drawn as it appears, for many

in Gothic documents
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Fred Botting

with changing his or her body with the help of excessive dieting, exercise and plastic surgery’ (37). The weight of absence, the collapse of stable external and agreed structures, bears directly on the subject him or herself, manifesting an implosion in which judgement and discrimination is defined increasingly by a dual rather than triangular relationship: image and simulation comes to the fore in

in Limits of horror
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William Hughes

think the odds are rather against the discrimination of the said doctors, than in favour of the miracle. The truth is, that a love of the marvellous is a disease which runs in the blood; the infirmity is, as we have already hinted [ Athenæum No. 542], obviously constitutional; and Lord Winchelsea was perfectly right when he protested the other day against

in That devil's trick