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David Annwn Jones

. The main influences on George Gilbert Scott’s successful Gothic design for the Albert Memorial (1864–76) were the thirteenth-century ‘Eleanor Crosses’. Soon after the appearance of film, directors began to appreciate the dramatic possibilities of these settings. D. W. Griffith’s The Greatest Question (1919) is amongst the first films to culminate in a dream-like graveyard scene. George A

in Gothic effigy
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Peter Hutchings

Career overview So far as his career in cinema was concerned, Terence Fisher was always something of a latecomer. He did not enter the film industry until he was twenty-nine years old, he did not become a film director until he was forty-three, and he did not direct his first horror film (the type of film upon which his reputation was built) until he was fifty-two. To a certain extent, he was also a

in Terence Fisher
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Peter Marks

and film comedy, registers his contribution, as does Take Ten: Contemporary British Film Directors (1991). There, Peter Greenaway speaks of admiring Gilliam and fellow Python Terry Jones for their anarchy and irreverence, 4 while Derek Jarman puts ‘glorious Terry Gilliam’s Brazil ’ on a very short list of British 1970s and 1980s films he would keep. 5 By

in Terry Gilliam
Recursive and self-reflexive patterns in David Cronenberg’s Videodrome and eXistenZ
Steffen Hantke

light of the thematic and stylistic consistency of the six feature films he had made since Videodrome , it looks like Cronenberg prevailed by way of sheer stubborn persistence. 1 This is not to say, as Jonathan Crane reads the arc of Cronenberg’s career, that, once upon a time, Cronenberg ‘ was a horror film director’, but now, ‘as Cronenberg’s career has developed, his recent films cannot be so

in Monstrous adaptations
Peter Hutchings

the film that are not identifiable in any other way. The significant thing here is how distant such a reading seems from the sort of film-making associated with Terence Fisher. Horror as a genre has often been associated with non-conventional representations of gender and has attracted film-makers who are themselves gay and/or concerned to explore same-sex desire (in terms of British film directors, one thinks of James Whale

in Terence Fisher
Peter Hutchings

essentially the Baron’s redundancy. Stylistically it is competent but lacks any of the distinctive Fisher touches one finds elsewhere in his work. However, as Terence Fisher’s final film, it does afford him something that so many film directors’ careers have lacked – a quietly dignified exit. Notes 1 Harry Ringel, ‘Terence Fisher: the human

in Terence Fisher
Peter Marks

Making You Laugh , when he launched himself into an area without a track record. With Holy Grail , becoming a film director was similarly marked by his own enthusiasm, and by the lack of others (Jones apart) willing to take up the challenge. But the decision that Gilliam and Jones would direct had economic implications, established film companies refusing to finance the project. Their caution was

in Terry Gilliam
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Gothic television – texts and contexts
Helen Wheatley

television cannot succeed in producing horror. However, unlike King, Waller’s argument centres on the medium’s inferiority to film rather than its inability to surpass the real horrors presented on television: ‘on most television sets, shadows and darkness become murky, textureless areas that lack the ominous blackness so often favoured by horror film directors’ ( 1987b : 159). While the historical

in Gothic television
Peter Hutchings

included in the Filmography. This is primarily because, so far as I am aware, very little of this material is available for viewing. The history of the part played by television in the careers of British film directors in the post-war period is yet to be written. 41 Pirie, A Heritage of Horror , p. 51

in Terence Fisher