Search results

You are looking at 21 - 26 of 26 items for :

  • Anthropology x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Enacting human rights in mental health care in Ghana
Ursula M. Read

, Jorun Rugkasa and Tom Burns (pp. 301–314 ). Oxford : Oxford University Press . Atilola , O. and F. Olayiwola ( 2013 ) ‘ Frames of mental illness in the Yoruba genre of Nigerian movies: implications for orthodox mental health care ’, Transcultural Psychiatry 50 ( 3 ), 442–54 . doi: 10

in Global health and the new world order
Abstract only
Migrant prehistory
Paul Carter

Jefferies, commenting on the anomie of the labouring class in rural Wiltshire saw no solution except emigration or ‘village organisation’ to reclaim some powers of local self-government. Trying to remedy the mass unemployment caused by enclosure, Joseph Arch distinguished between migration (by which he meant relocation inside England – recommended) and emigration (to Canada, Australia, etc. – a last measure), but even by these criteria the Carters were stay-at-homes. A name like ours – defining a genre of labour, it suggested the irrelevance of any personal identification

in Translations, an autoethnography
Abstract only
The endless arrival
Paul Carter

odds with the neo-colonialist pieties of the new nation state. A new monumental simulacrum of the past has, again, settled the past as past; and the place spirits, if they approached to see what we were doing, have retreated further than ever. Both Jadi Jadian and its predecessor, Light , were conceived as walking dramas. Culturally, they were kinds of Miracle Play. Conceptually, there were elements reminiscent of the genre of urban pageant whose best-known representative is the RamLila performed in the town of Ramnagar

in Translations, an autoethnography
Abstract only
Parables of return
Paul Carter

On my shelves are notebooks numbered from A1 forwards. The initial not only refers to a geographical shift but to a change of genre. Earlier notebooks kept in Italy or Spain are poetic or ecphrastic jottings, first-hand accounts of inner developments and external impressions. They typically juxtapose draft poems and prose passages that draw in recent reading, looking and walking, and draw out whatever aesthetic lessons reside there. There is a sustained diary from Venice but given the disproportion between the collective vision and its

in Translations, an autoethnography
Abstract only
Nostalgia and al-zaman al-gamiil (the ‘beautiful old times’)
Mona Abaza

music genres defies any logic. It also fascinates me, as I think it could well be the subject of a superb anthropological work on Cairo’s unique and disturbing soundscapes as an expression of the increasing ‘disjunctures’ (to borrow from Appadurai) of globalisation (Appadurai 1990: 295) as well as the specificity of the ‘glocalisation’ processes. But practically speaking, one has to wonder whether the multilingual songs – German lullabies, high Arabic or colloquial Sufi zikr and other religious music, famous Arabic film songs, or Egyptian belly dances – really have

in Cairo collages
An ethnography in/of computational social science
Mette My Madsen, Anders Blok, and Morten Axel Pedersen

to map the ‘social fabric’ of DTU, incorporating also ‘thick’ ethnographic data obtained from ‘embedding’ an anthropology PhD student, Mette My Madsen, within the freshmen cohort for a year. Here, disparate data worlds and research practices associated with computational and ethnographic approaches come to rub closely off each other and therefore represent a promising laboratory for ‘testing’ various ideas about the meetings and/or clashes between different registers and genres of quantitative and qualitative data. Our argument in this chapter, and our motivation

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world