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Place, space and discourse
Editors: Christine Agius and Dean Keep

Identity is often regarded as something that is possessed by individuals, states, and other agents. In this edited collection, identity is explored across a range of approaches and under-explored case studies with a view to making visible its fractured, contingent, and dynamic features. The book brings together themes of belonging and exclusion, identity formation and fragmentation. It also examines how identity functions in discourse, and the effects it produces, both materially and in ideational terms. Taking in case studies from Asia-Pacific, Europe, the Middle East and Latin America, the various chapters interrogate identity through formal governing mechanisms, popular culture and place. These studies demonstrate the complex and fluid nature of identity and identity practices, as well as implications for theorising identity.

Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Karl Polanyi (1886–1964) returned to public discourse in the 1990s, when the Soviet Union imploded and globalization erupted. Best known for The Great Transformation, Polanyi’s wide-ranging thought anticipated twenty-first-century civilizational challenges of ecological collapse, social disintegration and international conflict, and warned that the unbridled domination of market capitalism would engender nationalist protective counter-movements. In Karl Polanyi and Twenty-First-Century Capitalism, Radhika Desai and Kari Polanyi Levitt bring together prominent and new thinkers in the field to extend the boundaries of our understanding of Polanyi's life and work. Kari Polanyi Levitt's opening essay situates Polanyi in the past century shaped by Keynes and Hayek, and explores how and why his ideas may shape the twenty-first century. Her analysis of his Bennington Lectures, which pre-dated and anticipated The Great Transformation, demonstrates how Central European his thought and chief concerns were. The next several contributions clarify, for the first time in Polanyi scholarship, the meaning of money as a fictitious commodity. Other contributions resolve difficulties in understanding the building blocks of Polanyi's thought: fictitious commodities, the double movement, the United States' exceptional development, the reality of society and socialism as freedom in a complex society. The volume culminates in explorations of how Polanyi has influenced, and can be used to develop, ideas in a number of fields, whether income inequality, world-systems theory or comparative political economy. Contributors: Fred Block, Michael Brie, Radhika Desai, Michael Hudson, Hannes Lacher, Kari Polanyi Levitt, Chikako Nakayama, Jamie Peck, Abraham Rotstein, Margaret Somers, Claus Thomasberger, Oscar Ugarteche Galarza.

Open Access (free)
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

humanitarian intervention are far from being a simple and clear-cut matter. Although some governments, such as in the UK, have made valuable contributions to articulating a set of criteria, there remains no consensus on this matter in the international community as a whole. 3 With the events of 11 September 2001 prompting an international intervention in Afghanistan, albeit for reasons other than humanitarian imperatives, the

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
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Mary Venner

illustrates several common potential problems in international intervention including failure to appreciate the political implications of an apparently technical reform, and the need for effective coordination between international actors that may have avoided this problem. The DFID project was also one of the many examples of the use of divergent and incompatible legal drafting conventions and terminologies

in Donors, technical assistance and public administration in Kosovo
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Post-Cold War conflicts and the media
Philip Hammond

justification for this activism, however, were necessarily different from the past. This book is about how the media have interpreted conflict and international intervention in the years after the Cold War. By comparing press coverage of a number of different wars and crises, it seeks to establish which have been the dominant themes in explaining the post-Cold War international order and to discover how far the

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
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Place, identity and peacebuilding
Gëzim Visoka

either before or during the conflict have occupied influential political and socio-economic positions as part of the previous regime tend to be either self-excluded or excluded by others as a result of their past activity. Hence, the collective identity of existential outsiders and their social functions before and during the war often becomes a source of tension with the emplaced existential and subjective insiders. This typology of agents who are involved in international interventions and post-conflict peacebuilding is more comprehensive, yet nuanced, than any other

in The politics of identity
Philip M. Taylor

– and, following a series of air strikes on Serb army positions, the Americans bombed President Milosevic to the negotiating table and at last brokered a peace agreement known as the Dayton Peace Accords. An interesting twist to this entire story emerged when veteran BBC reporter Martin Bell argued in his memoirs that the reporting of the Balkans conflict had been too detached and that it had accordingly failed to prompt serious international intervention to stop the slaughter. That a supposed objective reporter working for a public service broadcaster should call for

in Munitions of the Mind
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Mary Venner

by most major powers. On this basis it would appear that the post-conflict exercise in Kosovo has been a success. This is not the impression given, however, in much of the academic literature on UNMIK and evaluations of governance and public administration in present-day Kosovo. Many accounts of the results of the international intervention create a general impression of failure and disappointment

in Donors, technical assistance and public administration in Kosovo
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Mary Venner

all parties much harder. Ongoing inter-ethnic hostility and the flight of most of the Serb population, a complex political situation with competing groups claiming to be the legitimate government, and a desire by many in the local population to return to the certainties of the past rather than to embrace rapid transformation presented significant challenges to the international intervention

in Donors, technical assistance and public administration in Kosovo