Search results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 14,264 items for :

  • "materiality" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Pratik Chakrabarti

the West Indies, Greenland and Asia. 3 The Orientalists under William Jones, on the other hand, were searching for the common civilizational roots across Asia and Europe. 4 At the same time, these pursuits were also linked to the material context of eighteenth-century colonialism and defined by the maritime and territorial power of the EEIC. This chapter will describe how these developments shaped the emergence of imperial materia medica. The term materia medica has been loosely used by naturalists and

in Materials and medicine
Trade, conquest and therapeutics in the eighteenth century

Medicine was transformed in the eighteenth century. Aligning the trajectories of intellectual and material wealth, this book uncovers how medicine acquired a new materialism as well as new materials in the context of global commerce and warfare. It studies the expansion of medicine as it acquired new materials and methods in an age of discovery and shows how eighteenth-century therapeutics encapsulates the intellectual and material resources of conquest. Bringing together a wide range of sources, the book argues that the intellectual developments in European medicine were inextricably linked to histories of conquest, colonisation and the establishment of colonial institutions. Medicine in the eighteenth-century colonies was shaped by the two main products of European mercantilism: minerals and spices. Forts and hospitals were often established as the first signs of British settlement in enemy territories, like the one in Navy Island. The shifting fortunes on the Coromandel Coast over the eighteenth century saw the decline of traditional ports like Masulipatnam and the emergence of Madras as the centre of British trade. The book also explores the emergence of materia medica and medical botany at confluence of the intellectual, spiritual and material quests. Three different forms of medical knowledge acquired by the British in the colonies: plants (columba roots and Swietenia febrifuga), natural objects and indigenous medical preparations (Tanjore pills). The book examines the texts, plants, minerals, colonial hospitals, dispensatories and the works of surgeons, missionaries and travellers to demonstrate that these were shaped by the material constitution of eighteenth century European colonialism.

History through material culture provides a practical introduction for researchers who wish to use objects and material culture as primary sources for the study of the past. The book focuses primarily on the period 1500 to the present day, but the principles put forward are equally applicable to studies of earlier historical eras. Histories of the last five centuries have been driven to a remarkable extent by textual records and it is with this in mind that History through material culture offers researchers a step-by-step guide to approaching the material evidence that survives from this period. Anticipating that many researchers will feel under-skilled or lacking in confidence in tackling artefacts of the past, the book traces the process of research from the framing of research questions through to the writing up of findings – giving particular attention to the ways in which objects can be located, accessed and understood. This practical guidance is augmented by the use of examples of seminal and contemporary scholarship in this interdisciplinary field, so that readers can see how particular approaches to sources have been used to develop historical narratives and arguments. It is written in accessible and jargon-free language with clear explanations of more complex discourses. In this way, the book demystifies both the process of researching objects and the way research practice relates to published scholarship.

Adored, forgotten about, potent and mundane objects
Sophie Woodward

Introduction Material collections have been understood as a form of ‘special’ consumption, consisting of items separated off from use (Belk, 1995 ); if we approach them instead through the lens of the mundane, houses and other everyday spaces are full of collections of objects which include the used and the unused, the special and the forgotten about (Woodward and Greasley, 2015 ). A wardrobe is a case in point – containing cherished items like a wedding dress, habitual items we wear all the time like a pair of jeans, and items that never make

in Mundane Methods
Denim and silk
Robert Shaughnessy

. Perhaps taking his cue from Ralph Koltai’s pop-art settings for the National Theatre six years earlier (see Chapter V ), designer Christopher Morley rendered Arden non-realistically: for some reviewers, by what appeared to be organic material, in the shape of ‘hanging wooden poles’ (Michael Billington, Guardian , 13 June), ‘a grove of bamboos or an assortment of organ pipes’ (J. C. Trewin

in As You Like It
Olga Demetriou

2 Materiality, imbrication, and the longue durée of Greco-Turkish borders Olga Demetriou Borders are irreducibly material structures. Even when they refer to non-material categories (e.g. difference, mental borders, disciplinary boundaries) the image conjured up to conceptualize these is that of a state border, drawn as a line on a map and policed with people and infrastructure on the ground. And yet attempts to understand these precise borders in their materiality have shown time and again in border studies that this ‘line’ is a ruse, that the more we take

in The political materialities of borders
Nataša Gregorič Bon

7 Silenced border crossings and gendered material flows in southern Albania Nataša Gregorič Bon My friend Maria and I were sitting on the front porch of the house of the village teacher, Naso, admiring his garden in the spring sun.1 Naso was in the kitchen, preparing a welcome drink (qeras/kerasmo2). Within a few minutes he was in the doorway, holding two glasses of peach juice, which he carefully set on the table in front of us. He smiled and said: When a man is at home alone he brings the drinks in his hands and not on a tray as his wife would do. This is

in Migrating borders and moving times
Antonius C. G. M. Robben

Thousands of people died in Rotterdam during the Second World War in more than 300 German and Allied bombardments. Civil defence measures had been taken before the German invasion of the Netherlands in May 1940 and these efforts were intensified during the country’s occupation as Allied bombers attacked Rotterdam’s port, factories, dry docks and oil terminals. Residential neighbourhoods were also hit through imprecise targeting and by misfired flak grenades. Inadequate air raid shelters and people’s reluctance to enter them caused many casualties. The condition of the corpses and their post-mortem treatment was thus co-constituted by the relationship between the victims and their material circumstances. This article concludes that an understanding of the treatment of the dead after war, genocide and mass violence must pay systematic attention to the materiality of death because the condition, collection and handling of human remains is affected by the material means that impacted on the victims.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Cambodia’s bones
Fiona Gill

The display of human remains is a controversial issue in many contemporary societies, with many museums globally removing them from display. However, their place in genocide memorials is also contested. Objections towards the display of remains are based strongly in the social sciences and humanities, predicated on assumptions made regarding the relationship between respect, identification and personhood. As remains are displayed scientifically and anonymously, it is often argued that the personhood of the remains is denied, thereby rendering the person ‘within’ the remains invisible. In this article I argue that the link between identification and personhood is, in some contexts, tenuous at best. Further, in the context of Cambodia, I suggest that such analyses ignore the ways that local communities and Cambodians choose to interact with human remains in their memorials. In such contexts, the display of the remains is central to restoring their personhood and dignity.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Bronwyn Labrum

15 Collecting, curating and exhibiting cross-cultural material histories in a post-settler society Bronwyn Labrum Introduction: a history curator looks back (and forward) This chapter is a ‘think piece’ about history curating in a postcolonial context through a focus on objects. My field is Aotearoa New Zealand, a former British colony in the South Pacific. I want to raise issues to do with Pākehā (European, non-Indigenous) curatorship in relation to, and also in contrast with, Indigenous collections and displays. I pose the questions: What does a twenty

in Curatopia