Search results

You are looking at 21 - 24 of 24 items for :

  • "materiality" x
  • Methods and Guides x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

researchers who carry out a lot of research with people or sensitive materials, for instance, are already likely to be very familiar with ethical processes. However, for some it might be the first time that you have thought about ethics; for instance, your research may relate to desk-, field- or lab-based activities that simply do not generate ethical issues, and therefore it can occasionally come as a surprise that there might be some ethical considerations to take into account when communicating with people. Alternatively, you may be based in an organisation which does

in Creative research communication
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

for scientific terms and any other necessary materials. Consider how participants will be recruited (e.g. is there an existing organisation through which you might recruit participants?). Develop methods to assess and monitor project, provide feedback to participants. Stage 3: Design data collection tools Develop a clear, easy-to-use protocol. Determine how data are to be collected (e.g. paper, email, app). Ensure these are appropriate to the

in Creative research communication
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

explains how this material helps him to answer the question, which is: ‘Outline and critically assess Foucault’s contribution to postmodern thought.’ This paragraph occurs in the middle of his essay and is used primarily to outline a key aspect of Foucault’s thinking; as the student says, ‘Perhaps the most important element of Foucault’s work, that on Power/Knowledge should now be considered.’ This sentence is indeed a gesture towards the essay question but it does not go far enough in showing how the whole paragraph helps to answer the question. The point of the

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

challenges that might occur (e.g. the context of the engagement, people are unprepared, have expectations that are not met etc.). Plan which would be the most appropriate approach to undertake (e.g. inform, consult, involve, collaborate, empower etc.). Decide which engagement method will be used (e.g. dialogue, citizen juries, polling, online etc.). Assess what information will be needed by participants (e.g. objective and appropriate guidance or materials). Consider the resource requirements (e.g. time, logistics, facilitation or

in Creative research communication