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Meaning, communication and affect
Nick Crossley

, it is also because our perception and understanding of musical signs draws upon interpretive conventions, sedimented experiences, habits and embodied know-how which are widely shared. And not only by audiences but also, to reiterate, by composers and performers who deliberately invoke them – knowing them to be shared reference points. Such meanings aren't shared by everybody and may be restricted to the members of particular music worlds (which in this respect are akin to Danto's ( 1964 ) ‘art worlds’ and Fish's ( 1980 ) ‘interpretive communities’, as

in Connecting sounds
A tale of three cities
Nick Crossley

: Liverpool, Manchester and Sheffield. I discuss each in turn, beginning with Manchester, whose story I pick up from Chapter 7. In each case I structure my discussion around a set of common academic themes, exploring differences but more especially similarities between these three local worlds which were particularly striking when I was examining the secondary and archival material regarding them. Four themes in ­particular are important: 1 Focal places. As suggested earlier in the book, local music worlds tend to form around particular places within a city. These places

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
Nick Crossley

did for a number of other fanzines, including Shane MacGowan’s one-off: Bondage. Indeed, it was Evolution of the London network 141 Armstrong who suggested the fanzine idea to Perry. Many other zines were to follow, throughout the UK, and another key element of punk’s DIY culture was born: spreading the word and providing a vehicle for insider criticism and debate. As noted in Chapter 2, publications are often a crucial element in the generation of a music world, partly because they extend networks and therefore the flow of styles, meanings, identities, etc., but

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
Abstract only
Scott Wilson

Lewis was the Devil … All of a sudden I found myself in love with the world. So there was only one thing that I could do: ding-a-ding-dang my dang-a-long ling-long’ (Ministry, ‘Jesus Built My Hot Rod’, 1992). Church halls were soon superseded by many other sites and scenes as the Introduction 3 setting for the devil’s music. Radio, film, television and the marketing of gramophone records enabled the spread of American popular music world wide, rock ’n’ roll quickly replacing Hollywood as the most powerful mode of American seduction of the world’s youth. Indeed, it

in Great Satan’s rage
Abstract only
Gemma King

are an unexpected asset. Following Sur mes lèvres ’s study of translingual communication, 2005’s multilingual De battre mon cœur s’est arrêté ( The Beat My Heart Skipped ) is a tense drama in which Tom (Romain Duris) is caught between the classical music world of his deceased mother and the ethereal pianist Miao Lin (Linh Dan Pham), and the dirty real-estate world of his father (Niels

in Jacques Audiard
Abstract only
Broadcast networks, media and moral panics
Nick Crossley

in media discourse, offered a sense of collective identity and belonging at a time when many young people were in need of it. The CCCS are wrong, in this respect, to suggest that the media only disarm youth subcultures. As Sarah Thornton (1994) suggests, they are often integral to subcultural formation – at least as a mass phenomenon. But the CCCS are right about the role of subcultures, or music worlds, in affording their participants a sense of meaning and belonging. Punks were a tribe, a home for the homeless. And of course the controversy surrounding punk was a

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
Use, taste, identity
Nick Crossley

-cultures (Clarke et al. 1993 ; Hebdige 1988 ; see also Kahn-Harris 2007 ). Alternative music worlds, it would seem, often serve as a refuge for those who feel that they do not fit. Lyrics too are important in helping listeners who are seeking to make sense of their lives. Certain of Willis's ( 1978 ) hippies, who were undergoing some form of existential crisis, used music to make sense of and achieve a degree of mastery over their feelings, for example. They found music therapeutic, believing that their preferred artists understood their situation far better than

in Connecting sounds
Peter J. Martin

. (Among many notable immigrants, Friedrich Engels was a regular attender at Hallé’s concerts; Whitfield, 1988: 103). Through his participation in the Parisian music world of the 1840s, Hallé was already thoroughly imbued with the ‘serious music’ ideology fostered, as we have seen, Chap 6 10/7/06 11:51 am Page 117 Musical life in the ‘first industrial city’ 117 by aristocrats in both Vienna and London, but by then widely accepted (Johnson, 1995: 270ff). Hallé’s subsequent career in Manchester was driven by this commitment. As a recent refugee from what he

in Music and the sociological gaze
Peter J. Martin

education (Marquis, 1999), with implications which will be considered further below. Moreover, despite its informal pattern of organisation, the jazz world is highly centralised; since the 1940s, New York City – ‘the world’s largest jazz community’ (Berliner, 1994: 5) – has been recognised as the ‘scene’ where players must establish themselves if they are to be acknowledged as top performers. Whereas in the classical music world performance standards are maintained through formal training and examination, the development of jazz musicians – though no less rigorous – is

in Music and the sociological gaze
Abstract only
Peter J. Martin

or another. Finnegan (1989) demonstrated the many ways in which participation in a musicworld’ – even peripherally, and irrespective of the music’s ‘quality’ – could nevertheless provide people with both social and aesthetic satisfactions. Hennion quite explicitly focused on the activities of ‘music lovers’ (2001), while the karaoke enthusiasts studied by Drew, and Bull’s personal-stereo users, were evidently people who had a deep attachment to ‘their’ music, whatever style or genre they preferred. (Indeed, one of the strengths of Bull’s study derives from the

in Music and the sociological gaze