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Experimentation and Armchair Theatre
Helen Wheatley

live recording we were living dangerously.35 White’s memory of Armchair Mystery Theatre as fast-paced and edgy is confirmed by close analysis of the available episodes of the series, and particularly the teleplay Man and Mirror written by Robert Muller and directed by Patrick Dromgoole, a Victorian domestic psychodrama. This episode called on the vision mixer or ‘switcher’ to create striking extended montages of superimposed images in order to produce an impressionist representation of the spiralling madness of one of its central characters. In line with Susan

in Experimental British television
Roger Singleton-Turner

, reducing strain and allowing the operator to move the pedestal or other mount without calling on the services of another member of the crew. Tally lights TV studio cameras should have tally lights. Conventionally, these are red and show when the camera is selected by the Vision Mixer (Switcher) – that is, when it is ‘on shot’. There will be one tally light on top of the camera visible from the front (but see page 46 ) and a second, small one, over or under the viewfinder screen (as in Plate 6 ). The one on the front tells Presenters, Actors and floor staff which

in Cue and Cut
Abstract only
Roger Singleton-Turner

positions can be drawn with a 2p piece, which works very well, or, in the US, a dollar piece is the nearest equivalent. An old UK penny (pre-decimalisation) is right for 48 : 1 plans; in the US, a ½ dollar should work. The Vision Mixer or Switcher (who would not often be present at the actual Planning Meeting) and FM need to know where each named guest is sitting. This information can be marked on a floor plan: perhaps copies modified just for them. A4 shrunk copies of the finished floor plan for the Camera Operators are helpful if there are more than a couple of

in Cue and Cut
Abstract only
Jonathan Bignell

colour monitor screen showing the director’s choice of shot from among the possibilities offered by each camera for each moment of the programme. The role of the director, working with the vision mixer, is to instruct the camera operators what to shoot and then to select from the shots offered by each camera to create a single sequence of shots that will comprise the programme. What Beckett would have seen in the gallery at Stuttgart, then, would have been the ‘master’ monitor in colour, together with monitors ranged alongside it where the output of the single camera

in Beckett on screen
Richard Hewett

working closely with actors in the rehearsal rooms, and the technician, planning camera moves prior to entering the studio, and separated from the cast on the day of transmission. At this point in time direction for studio television bore little resemblance to film, due to the fact that editing took place during the performance 49 rather than in post-​production; the vision mixer would cut between cameras in real time according to the director’s carefully prepared plan. Although several BBC television directors, including George More O’Ferrall and Michael Barry, had

in The changing spaces of television acting
Richard Hewett

according to the sets that were erected in the studio, rather than in strict story order, scenes would still have to be played in their entirety, and editing would take place ‘live’, the vision mixer cutting between cameras as the performance took place. This distinction continued to mark television studio drama apart from single camera film production, where scenes could be performed in sections and later pieced together in post-​production. Studio work for ‘The Fourth Horseman’ began with eight hours of camera rehearsal at Television Centre on Tuesday 18 February 1975

in The changing spaces of television acting