Search results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 2,895 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Thomas Hajkowski

Introduction On New Year’s Eve, 1945, William Haley, the Director-General of the BBC, composed a memo to Lindsay Wellington, Head of the BBC’s Home Service and one of his top lieutenants. Haley had just completed his first full year as Director-General. He had led the BBC through the final stages of the Second World War and the difficult transition to peacetime broadcasting. Like many of us, he used the occasion of New Year’s Eve to reflect on the past year and look forward to the future. Contemplating the position of broadcasting in Britain, Haley judged it

in The BBC and national identity in Britain, 1922–53
Empire and identity, 1923–39
Thomas Hajkowski

1 “Jolly proud you are a Britisher:” empire and identity, 1923–39 O n the evening of December 13, 1939, Val Gielgud, Head of the BBC’s Features and Drama Department, listened to the final installment of the Drama Department’s serialized adaptation of A. E. W. Mason’s imperial adventure story The Four Feathers. The following day he wrote to the producer of the series, Peter Creswell, to congratulate him on its success. He noted to Creswell that the Director-General, F. W. Ogilvie, and the Home Service Board praised the program,1 concluding that “the romantic

in The BBC and national identity in Britain, 1922–53
The BBC and popular television culture in the 1950s
Author: Su Holmes

This book focuses attention on a particular aspect of the British Broadcasting Corporation's (BBC) remit. It examines how the concepts of both 'public service' and the 'popular' were interpreted by the BBC. The book also examines how their relationship changed over time, moving across the early history of radio and television, up until the advent of Independent Television (ITV). It explores The Grove Family, which has secured a certain visibility in British television history due to its status as "British television's first soap opera". By focusing on a number of programme case studies such as the soap opera, the quiz/game show, the 'problem' show and programmes dealing with celebrity culture, the book demonstrates how BBC television surprisingly explored popular interests and desires. The book details how the quiz or game show, or to use the dominant term from the time, the "give-away" show, has been used to map sharp differences between the BBC and ITV in the 1950s. It focuses on the BBC's 'problem' or 'private life' programme, Is This Your Problem? ( ITYP?), in which members of the public asked the advice of an expert panel. The book explores television's relations with fame in the 1950s. It details how This is Your Life (TIYL) became a privileged site for debates about television's renegotiation of the boundaries of public/private, particularly with regard to audiences' cultural access to famous selves.

Regional broadcasting and identity in “Ulster”
Thomas Hajkowski

7 This Is Northern Ireland: regional broadcasting and identity in “Ulster” T his chapter makes three interconnected claims. First, that BBC Northern Ireland (hereafter BBC NI) played a vital role in maintaining a strong British national consciousness in Northern Ireland. Second, that BBC NI selfconsciously sought to also construct a unifying “Ulster” identity for the new province. As with Scotland and Wales, the BBC’s projection of “Ulsterness” did not represent the abandonment of unionism or British identity but was rather an attempt to assert the

in The BBC and national identity in Britain, 1922–53
Darrell M. Newton

3658 Paving the empire road:Layout 1 30/6/11 08:45 Page 216 5 Contemporary voices from within Let’s put multicultural programming and diversity at the heart of our promises. If Channel 4 can do it, we can do it better, and we must enforce these principles in all our sister companies which carry the BBC name. My friends, this is the route we must take if we are to be at the forefront of change in 21-Century multicultural Britain. (BBC Accountant Valerie Johnson Crooks, BBC Black Forum, question and answer session, 21 June 2001) As the BBC attempted to

in Paving the empire road
The BBC and the Ministry of Information
Scott Anthony

5 The limits of public relations: The BBC and the Ministry of Information John Grierson would later describe Tallents’s pioneering publicity work during the interwar period as one of ‘the more curious feats of Civil Service bravery’.1 Tallents was a generous and far-sighted patron of artists, administrators and thinkers, and the success of his reformist conception of public relations rested upon the freedom of an enlightened individual to negotiate between competing internal and external priorities. In Tallents’s definition, public relations was an imaginative

in Public relations and the making of modern Britain
The BBC and national identity in Scotland
Thomas Hajkowski

5 Broadcasting a nation: the BBC and national identity in Scotland T his chapter argues that the BBC and its station in Scotland played an important role in sustaining and reinforcing a complex sense of Scottish national identity during the period from 1923 to 1953. The BBC did not act as an agent in the anglicization of Scotland, nor did it seek to impose a wholly metropolitan, southern English culture or identity on Scotland. Rather, the BBC, perhaps the most powerful institution for the dissemination of information and entertainment in Scotland, constructed

in The BBC and national identity in Britain, 1922–53
BBC America and transnational constructs of Britishness
Darrell M. Newton

1 A little Brit different? BBC America and transnational constructs of Britishness Darrell M. Newton I think it’s very important for people to accept that Britain is a multicultural society. The sooner they realise that, the better. (South Asians from Glasgow interviewed by the Commission for Racial Equality, 2005)1 As noted by Barbara Selznick, the 1990s represented a decade in which the co-production of television programming for international audiences provided a catalyst toward a rapidly expanding global culture. In televising these projects, US cable

in Adjusting the contrast
The BBC and the empire, 1939–53
Thomas Hajkowski

2 From the war to ­Westminster Abbey: the BBC and the ­empire, 1939–53 F or the historian, examining the BBC’s representation of empire during the Second World War is both challenging and particularly revealing. C ­ onsistent with its policies from the 1930s, the BBC broadcast a considerable number of empire programs. As Chapter 1 made clear, these pre-war programs carried a significant amount of ideological content. But during the war, the empire and Commonwealth had to be constructed with even greater deliberation and precision. Although the BBC had resolved

in The BBC and national identity in Britain, 1922–53
Abstract only
British horror radio from the advent of broadcasting to the digital age
Author: Richard J. Hand

This groundbreaking book is the first full-length study of British horror radio from the pioneering days of recording and broadcasting right through to the digital audio cultures of our own time. The book offers an historical, critical and theoretical exploration of horror radio and audio performance examining key areas such as writing, narrative, adaptation, performance practice and reception throughout the history of that most unjustly neglected of popular art forms: radio drama and “spoken word” auditory cultures. The volume draws on extensive archival research as well as insightful interviews with significant writers and actors. The book offers detailed analysis of major radio series such as Appointment with Fear, The Man in Black, The Price of Fear and Fear on Four as well as one-off horror plays, comedy-horror and experimental uses of binaural and digital technology in producing uncanny audio.