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Elisabeth van Houts

Pontorson. 1 This region roughly corresponded to the ecclesiastical province of the archbishopric of Rouen, which itself was based on the Roman administrative unit centred on that city. The inhabitants were for the most part Frankish but included a significant minority of Scandinavian settlers from Norway, Denmark and from Scandinavian settlements in Britain, who formed the ruling

in The Normans in Europe
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Martin Heale

wealthy Benedictine monastery’s patrons, the Despensers, emphasising the family’s connections with the abbey. Translated (with corrections of transcription from British Library, Cotton MS Cleop. C iii) from W. Dugdale, Monasticon Anglicanum , ed. J. Caley, H. Ellis and B. Bandinel (London, 1846), II, 59–65 (Latin). In AD 1359 the lady Elizabeth le

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
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Jennifer Ward

. Grant by Hawise, wife of William earl of Gloucester, c. 1150–83; the reference to the gift from her husband probably means that this property formed part of her dower [From W. de G. Birch, ‘Original documents relating to Bristol and the neighbourhood’, Journal of the British Archaeological Association , XXXI, 1875, p. 292; in Latin] Men both present

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
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In search of pre-Reformation English spirituality
R. N. Swanson

miscellany of pieces which could also serve for instruction of the laity, possibly in a less formal format than that set out by Drury. 53 Pictorial representations were also possible, like the extremely complex scheme outlining the efficacy of the sacraments as the remedy to original sin for those willing to act on their demands which is crammed on to two pages of a manuscript now in the British Library. 54

in Catholic England
Paul Fouracre
and
Richard A. Gerberding

for Foillan’s body after his murder. For all these things we must turn to the Additamentum Nivialense de Fuilano , something which we shall do presently. Whether Frankish or Irish, his work nonetheless shows Irish influence, especially in the appearance of St Patrick in chapter 7. He also seems to have been of some standing in the community, since he was sent to Britain on the monastery

in Late Merovingian France
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Jennifer Ward

, 1153 [From British Library, London, Cotton MS. Nero E vii, fo. 8r; in Latin] Geoffrey de Favarches greets all the faithful people of holy Church which is in Christ. Be it known to you that I have given and granted in perpetual alms to God and St Mary and to Edwy my clerk the chapel which my mother founded in Walsingham in honour of Mary, ever Virgin, in order to establish the religious order

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
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The end of Edward III’s reign, 1376–77
Alison K. McHardy

important document, which presents considerable difficulties of translation, for it shows the problems that historical researchers sometimes encounter. British Library, Cotton Charter XVI 63. Printed: Michael Bennett, ‘Edward III’s entail and the succession to the crown, 1376–1471’, EHR 103 (1998), 580–609; text: 607–9. … land

in The reign of Richard II
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Jennifer Ward

together with Margery, the daughter and heir of Richard de Raimecurt, 1154–61 [From British Library, London, Sloane MS. 986, The Chartulary of the Braybroke Family, fo. 21; in Latin] Henry, king of England, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and count of Anjou, greets his archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls, barons, justices, sheriffs, officials, and all his faithful men of

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
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Jennifer Ward

services belonging to me from the aforesaid land. Witnessed by Robert my chaplain, Robert my knight of Barton, Robert my steward, Mabel my daughter, Aderiz Heaved. 14 107. Letter of Roger de Clare earl of Hertford to his grandmother, Adeliza de Clermont, her steward and men, soon after 1152 15 [From British Library, London, Cotton MS. Appendix xxi, fo. 22r; in Latin

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
Martin Heale

thought necessary for reform by the external visitor, following his inspection of the convent. It is revealing not only about the state of religion in the monastery, but also about the ecclesiastical authorities’ attitudes to female monasteries in fifteenth-century England. Translated (with minor corrections of transcription from British Library, Cotton Charter V

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535