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Graham Spencer

cities in relation to communal identity is similarly useful here. Diverse and creative cities, Sennett notes, are the opposite of those that seek to impose order based on myths of the purified community. Such places, for Sennett, breed narrow and violence-prone lives, as compared to cities that display vigour and diversity because of an ‘equilibrium of disorder’ (Sennett 1970 ). Both Connolly

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
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Politics, violence and resistance
Richard Jackson

the ‘war on terrorism’ prevents clear and creative thinking about alternative strategies and approaches; instead, it institutionalises an approach which has already proved to be counterproductive and damaging to the very institutions and values America and its allies are purportedly trying to protect. There is a genuine risk that the moral absolutism of the discourse induces political amnesia about

in Writing the war on terrorism
An interview with Liz O’Donnell
Graham Spencer

Agreement, as a document, was a masterful and creative piece of drafting and my legal training did help me. My experience as an opposition TD in interrogating words, drafting and amending legislation and being creative with language was also very useful. I should say that when I was appointed by the Cabinet to deal with the North I was sufficiently overawed by the responsibility ahead of me that I devoted

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
An interview with David Donoghue
Graham Spencer

officialdom, on which we drew in forming our sense of what was happening in Northern Ireland and in the peace process. The Secretariat had an outreach capacity which we utilised to the full, inviting in a whole range of people from different walks of life such as business, trade unions, social and community groups and political parties. Would you say that the peace process was a creative process

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
Duncan Morrow

but it also risks driving all policy-making to the lowest common denominator of consensus rather than creative choice. Partnership may be the framework for reconciliation but under conditions of antagonism it is also a loveless consociational marriage without the opportunity for divorce. Those elements of the Belfast Agreement which had been agreed

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
Elke Schwarz

was concerned that the cyclical, repetitive and literally futile acts involved in all life processes were recast as ‘creative’ work, as a form of action, in modernity. Where labour subsumes work, the backdrop of a shared world turned from permanence to futility. Here futility is not an expression of pointlessness but, rather, expresses the cyclical structure of consumption and production which is contrary to building permanent structures, as is the concern of

in Death machines
An interview with Wally Kirwan
Graham Spencer

Minister, who were heading the negotiating team and their legal advisors. The people we actually dealt with were found to be very creative and able to understand the need for a well-worked compromise. They were very constructive. Was there a similar concern about the need for agreed language and the implications of that language? There would have been after the

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
Life in a religious subculture after the Agreement
Gladys Ganiel and Claire Mitchell

over their religious choices. This shows us that, even in divided societies where religious belonging is a central part of social life, some individuals are able to make creative and brave choices to opt out religiously. But when this happened, people also tended to opt out politically, saying that neither unionist nor nationalist political parties represented them or their

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
Elizabeth Meehan and Fiona Mackay

with disabilities, ‘difficult to reach’ young people and people from black and ethnic minority backgrounds (Creative Scotland, 2010). Similarly to Stephen Moutray’s proposed alternative in Northern Ireland, the Scottish government and parliamentary bodies make extensive use of information technology to foster participation. An early comparison (Fawcett, 2001 ) of the devolved

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
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The problématique of culture in international conflict analysis
Tarja Väyrynen

cooperative relationships, in communicating and in exploring creative solutions. The main task of the workshop is, however, to carry out a concrete task, to contribute to the resolution of a particular conflict. There is a strong belief in rationality in traditional problem-solving conflict resolution. Since it is claimed that subjective (perceptions) and objective (human needs) elements play an important

in Culture and international conflict resolution