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Lorena De Vita

more than thirty books and sixty screenplays, free to move between East and West Germany, and one of the very few East Germans to be able to indulge in a passion for expensive cars, Kaul demonstrated a creative approach to agitprop that was possibly without equal in the workers’ and builders’ state. Just four days after Ben-Gurion’s announcement of the trial of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem, Kaul had written to Heinz Stadler, one of Albert Norden’s closest collaborators, pitching his ideas about how to approach the upcoming event. 44 ‘I have had the impression that

in Israelpolitik
Cultural and economic relations between the British film industry and Hollywood
Jonathan Stubbs

British Empire proved to be particularly popular in the United States, partly due to their incorporation of genre conventions from the Western. In a 1936 review of The Charge of the Light Brigade – which creatively relocated Tennyson’s poem to India’s northwest frontier – the critic of the New York Times declared, ‘England need have no fear of its empire so long as Hollywood insists on being the Kipling of the Pacific. The film city’s pious regard for the sacrosanct bearers of the white man’s burden continues to be one of the most amusing manifestations of Hollywood

in Culture matters
George Washington and Anglo-American memory diplomacy, c.1890–1925
Sam Edwards

of Englishmen against a usurping – and German – monarchy. 41 In turn, such ideas enabled a certain view of the colonial leadership. For if the cause was legitimate and the actions identifiably ‘English’ then it required little initiative or invention to see the Revolution’s leader – George Washington – as something akin to an eighteenth-century English ‘baron’ contesting the restrictions imposed by a foreign king. Certain facts of Washington’s life aided this work of creative interpretation. He was a Virginian planter rather than a New England radical and, as such

in Culture matters
Thomas C. Mills

to harness youthful energies to liberate American society from the alleged oppression of the capitalist system and create a truly participatory democracy that would allow individuals to realize their creative potential. 40 Politically aware folk artists like Pete Seeger, and most prominently Bob Dylan, provided the soundtrack for the New Left. In comparison to Dylan’s Freewheelin’ album of the previous year – which featured ‘protest songs’ targeting racial segregation and the arms industry – the Beatles’ output in 1964 seemed positively anodyne. Almost the

in Culture matters
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Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

As a musician who works for peace, ‘unity’ holds less interest for me than ‘harmony.’ Unity is when we all sing the same note. Harmony is when we sing different notes, and they are beautiful together. David Lamotte, musician and peace activist This quote from David Lamotte points to important aesthetic and creative considerations. It also highlights some

in Dancing through the dissonance
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

polarity; the fundamental belief in and pursuit of the creative act; and the acceptance of the inherent risk of stepping into the mystery of the unknown that lies beyond the far too familiar landscape of violence. 5 We share his belief that the wellspring of peacebuilding rests in the moral imagination and his acknowledgement that such imagination is difficult and messy, but also necessary for

in Dancing through the dissonance
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

and mirroring in particular can also have their challenges or limits, which we also explore. This chapter makes a few key points: (a) nonviolent engagement with, and expression of, emotions are vital to peacebuilding; (b) empathy can play an important role in emotional peacebuilding; and finally, (c) dance and creative movement activities, such as the use of mirroring, when done reflectively, can be valuable practices for developing empathy and supporting peacebuilding. Emotions, dance and the politics of building peace

in Dancing through the dissonance
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Anca Mihaela Pusca

chapter clearly suggested that a collective self-recognition of the trauma imposed by the transition as well as an acknowledgement of the “sacrifice” would do more good than forcing an overly positive image of it. Using Walter Benjamin’s creative engagements with the concept of shock, the chapter was also able to draw up some possible explanations for the relationship between intense feelings of nostalgia—in situations where these would not necessarily be warranted—and periods of transition and social change. Under particular circumstances, shock becomes much more than

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

peace[building] process. So, it really is localised to their needs. ‘Claire’, M4P founder, United States Do local actors working outside the Global North experience and perceive the M4P process as localised? And what does it mean to be localised when it comes to peacebuilding programming? In this chapter we investigate what dance and creative movement can tell us about local and/or global approaches to peacebuilding, including how the local and the global

in Dancing through the dissonance
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

in peacebuilding and the ways in which dance and creative movement can play a part in this process. The research conducted for this book suggests that dance can constitute an effective, inclusive pathway to support youth participation in peacebuilding. At the same time, the data gathered across the three case studies highlights the importance of developing approaches that are age specific, gender sensitive, culturally relevant and flexible. Youth, peace and security At least as far back as the beginning of the UN in 1945, the

in Dancing through the dissonance