Search results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 132 items for :

  • "Irish Catholicism" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Bryan Fanning

. Newman’s sociological focus from the late 1950s was on the impending decline of Irish Catholicism. In a 1959 book review in Christus Rex Newman observed that students of what was commonly called ‘Sociology’ in Ireland – that is as taught by him – would be very confused by how the subject was defined in other countries.15 As editor of Christus Rex he kept secular theoretical sociology at bay through censorship until the last issue of the journal in 1970 before it was relaunched as Social Studies. In a remarkable article in the final issue he referred to a plethora of

in Are the Irish different?
Bryan Fanning

. Newman’s sociological focus from the late 1950s was on the impending decline of Irish Catholicism. In a 1959 book review in Christus Rex Newman observed that students of what was ‘commonly called “Sociology” in Ireland – that is as taught by him – would be very confused by how the subject was defined in other countries’.16 As editor of Christus Rex he kept secular theoretical sociology at bay through censorship until the last ‘glasnost’ issue of the journal in 1970 before it was re-launched as Social Studies. In a remarkable article in the final issue he referred to a

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Abstract only
Cara Delay

-century Irish girls. Hyland’s narrative also raises questions about the ways in which girls experienced their Catholic childhoods, a topic understudied in both Irish women’s history and the history of Irish Catholicism. Through an analysis of women’s life-writings, including diaries, oral histories, autobiographies, and memoirs, this chapter explores the realities of growing up Catholic and female from 1850 to 1950, with a particular focus on the first half of the twentieth century. At this catholic girlhoods 59 time, religion served as the major influence in Irish girls

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Anne Kane

their old understandings, and to engage collectively in forging a new form of Irish nationalist identity. Neither the ICC, nor its representatives, or lay activists who appropriated Irish Catholic symbolic elements were able to control how those elements were interpreted, especially as Catholic discourse was constantly expressed in dialogue with other discourses. In short, Irish Catholicism was a determinative factor in the Irish Land War, but often not as the institution or its members intended. It was the process and outcome of symbolic construction through

in Land questions in modern Ireland
Abstract only
Bryce Evans

‘foster mother’ to an Irish corporative system and backed it for that reason. The historian John Whyte argued that Irish Catholicism was becoming ‘increasingly right-wing’104 in this period. This holds true in the social and cultural sphere post-war, but is less clear-cut in the heavily regulated economic realm operative during the Emergency, where profiteering was a key concern. In this respect, Irish Catholic social thought was indeed ‘right-wing’ in advocating market practices of mutuality redolent of a bygone medieval order. But Catholic theorists also condemned the

in Ireland during the Second World War
Emigration and the spread of Irish religious influence
Sarah Roddy

further self-congratulation. It was repeatedly asserted that Irish Catholics had proved themselves ‘inviolably attached’ to their religion, and capable of retaining their faith through centuries of challenges.17 Most recently, neither penal laws nor opportunistic proselytism had swayed anything more than a small minority away from Catholicism. As Cardinal Gibbons of Baltimore observed of the Irish, ‘no other people ever suffered for their Catholic faith as they’.18 This, many commentators felt, put Irish Catholicism on a higher plain. A Donnybrook priest told his

in Population, providence and empire
Louise Fuller

have suggested that nothing had changed in Irish Catholic culture. But this was not so – whereas surveys of Irish Catholicism in the 1970s and 1980s indicated a very high level of religious practice relative to other countries, they also recorded a decline in practice among younger people, especially males, and the urbanised. It was also found that when it came to moral teaching which had a bearing on how Catholics lived their lives, such as the prohibition of contraception and divorce significant Political fragmentation in independent Ireland 315 numbers of

in Irish Catholic identities
Bryan Fanning

chapter entitled ‘Paul Cullen: The Great Ultramontane’), an ecclesiastical imperialist who governed as if in a perpetual stage of siege. Such a man could not, Larkin argues, have had the play of mind or broad sympathies of a great intellectual. Cullen was defined, and in turn defined the Catholic Church in Ireland, through his fixed and narrow focus, his militant temper. He was, according to his Times obituary ‘fervently sincere, single-minded, devout, unflinching, distrustful of culture’. If Cullen was a father of modern Irish Catholicism he was in turn moulded by Pius

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Cara Delay

nineteenth century, the popular Margaret Cusack, nun of Kenmare, translated devotional works, wrote histories of Irish Catholicism, composed autobiographical works, and published novels.125 Cusack’s writings paid particular attention to the proper responsibilities of women and girls. In Woman’s Work in Modern Society (1874), she focused on the roles that mothers played in their daughters’ moral and religious education. 38 irish women If Catholic mothers did not focus their attention on ­preparing their girls for salvation, she argued, the results would be disastrous

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Abstract only
Michael G. Cronin

change. In this account, Irish Catholicism was an agent of bourgeois development and modernisation in the mid-nineteenth century. However, in the twentieth century almost precisely the same ideological formation effectively acted as a stubborn brake on modernisation. Until the society and the economy were opened up in the 1960s, the effects of a puritanical and repressive attitude to sexuality were not confined to the realm of private and emotional life since these attitudes also informed an Irish Catholic mentalité. This in turn produced a society averse to risk

in Impure thoughts