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T. J. H. McCarthy

IV’s kingship. 91 Aman, servant of King Ahasuerus and persecutor of the Jews: see Esther 7.10. 92 Ekkehard has confused the Battle of Homburg on the River Unstrut (9 June 1075) with the Battle of Mellrichstadt (7 August

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest
Abstract only
Stephen Penn

dating Wyclif’s Continuation of Logic and Third Treatise to 1371–74. See John Wyclif, Tractatus de Universalibus , ed. Ivan J. Mueller (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985), pp. xxxvii–xxxviii. This latter range of dates would certainly explain the philosophical sophistication of these two texts, but it would seem unlikely that Wyclif would have chosen to produce a second logical treatise so long after the publication of On Logic . 28 On Lyra see Jeremy Cohen, The Friars and the Jews: The Evolution of Medieval Anti-Judaism (Cornell

in John Wyclif
Stephen Penn

weaken, it is clear that a faithful person should publish that faith to listeners, boldly and in an orthodox manner, to the death. For in John 18[:20] the Lord says: ‘I have spoken openly to the world: I have always taught in the synagogue, and in the temple, whither all the Jews resort; and in secret I have spoken nothing.’ But Magog does not make his faith known, except in the private schools in which they and their confederates congregate, but they do not reveal their faith openly to the Christian community. Similarly, Christ teaches in Matthew 5[:16]: ‘So let your

in John Wyclif
Rachel Stone
and
Charles West

This chapter contains the translated text ofDe divortio. It has several underlying sections, responding to the questions that Hincmar initially received. These sections were, however, further divided to make the twenty-three responses which appear in the manuscript. The original sections are as follows: the procedure at the councils of Aachen, rules on marriage, divorce and remarriage, the validity of ordeals, the next steps in Theutberga's case, the sodomy charge, Lothar's relationship with Waldrada and sorcery, Lothar's possibilities of remarriage, and the response of bishops towards appeals to them and the case of Engeltrude. De divortio also deals with seven further questions which Hincmar received six months after the first: who is able to judge the king, can the king avoid further judgement in the case, the case of Engeltrude, and the effects of communion with the king.

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
Stephen Penn

probably conclude here that just as lepers had to show themselves to priests in the Old Law, as is known from Luke 17, so Christ, the author of both laws, approved that Old Law for his own time. This act of showing to priests should have ceased by the time of the New Law, however, in anticipation of Christ’s own healing of our souls. And that is revealed figuratively by the return of the Samaritan, who went back to Christ unlike the nine Jews who were healed in the same way. This has the power to signify figuratively that the lepers should run to the priests under the

in John Wyclif
Abstract only
T. J. H. McCarthy

those led by the priest Gottschalk. 137 His interest in the fate of Jewish communities in German cities extended into subsequent annals, for he recorded that at Regensburg in 1097 the emperor ‘allowed the Jews who had been coerced into baptism the use of their own laws’ and held an investigation at Mainz the following year concerning the theft of Jewish assets. 138

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest
Abstract only
Andrew Rabin

the mass unless he has each of these, and woe to him who puts anything foul in there; for he does then just as the Jews did when they mixed vinegar and gall together and afterwards gave it in mockery to Christ. 48 [40] And it is right that a priest should never celebrate mass and fail to receive the host, nor should he consecrate the Eucharist after it has been

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
Rosemary Horrox

Christians and the apostasy of many of them, leaving only a faithful remnant. The prophets Enoch and Elias would then appear and reconvert the apostates, and the Jews, before being killed. They would then be resurrected and ascend into heaven. Antichrist – still parodying the life of Christ – would then attempt his own ascension from the Mount of Olives, tricking his disciples by being borne aloft by

in The Black Death
Trevor Dean

for the rest of his term of office he should look to do what was right and to let anything else go. And this was said in such a way that from that time on almost no judge has given himself trouble in this matter, letting pass the garlands and cupels and suckling fur … 91 Assistance to converted Jews: Perugia, 1298 Having grappled in

in The towns of Italy in the later Middle Ages
Author:

The towns of later medieval Italy were one of the high points of urban society and culture in Europe before the industrial revolution. This book provides more inclusive and balanced coverage of Italian urban life in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. In looking for the chief features of Italian communal cities, it focuses on: the unity of city and dependent countryside, the stability of population, urban functions, the development of public spaces, social composition, the development of autonomous institutions, and civic culture. The book begins with three of these: Bonvesin da la Riva's innovative description of Milan, Giovanni da Nono's more conventional, but lively description of Padua, and an anonymous, verse description of Genoa. It also focuses on the buildings and their decoration, and urban 'social services'. The book then addresses Italian civic religion. It explores production and commerce: the effects of monetary affluence, the guilds and markets, government interventions to stimulate production, to regulate exchange, and to control the city's population. The book deals with social groups and social tensions: popolo against magnates, noble clans against each another, men against women, young men against city elders, Christians against Jews, freemen against slaves, food riots and tax revolts, acts of resistance and indecency. Finally, it examines the great variety of political regimes in late-medieval Italy: from consolidated communes such as Florence or Venice, to stable or unstable 'tyrannies' in Pisa, Ferrara or Verona.