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Renate Günther

Haine (1996) by Mathieu Kassovitz. The politics of Durassian cinema, on the other hand, consists precisely in her blending of differences, as she juxtaposes an immigrant workers’ ghetto with Western classical music and thus metaphorically dissolves the barriers of class, culture and ethnicity. Her cinema, then, functions as a melting pot, since she uses sound and image to bring together a variety of cultural influences and experiences. Her

in Marguerite Duras
Brigitte Rollet

jurists jailed in Malawi. Serreau has been involved in another similar project. In March 1997, she was approached by the association Handicap International to make a film denouncing the use of landmines. Ten directors from France and beyond (including for France, Bertrand Tavernier, Mathieu Kassovitz and Pierre Jolivet) were asked to make a short film (3 minutes). 32 The film Lumières sur un massacre, made up of the ten shorts, was broadcast on French channels in November and December 1997 before being released in French

in Coline Serreau
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Carrie Tarr

criticism in the mid-1990s as a way of categorising a series of independently released films set in the rundown multi-ethnic working-class estates (the cités ) on the periphery of France’s major cities (the banlieues ), the most significant of which was Mathieu Kassovitz’s La Haine (1995). In both cases, the labels have proved controversial and potentially reductive (see Hargreaves 1999 ; Higbee 2001a ). My use of the slightly different terms, beur and

in Reframing difference
De battre mon coeur s’est arrêté, Sur mes lèvres and De rouille et d’os
Gemma King

. Although Audiard has always worked with major rising and established actors in the French scene, Cotillard brings a transnational profile that is more aligned with that of a Hollywood star than those of mainstay Audiard leads such as Mathieu Kassovitz or the previously unknown Tahar Rahim. Cotillard’s performance greatly contributed to De rouille et d’os ’s success on the awards circuit, as well

in Jacques Audiard
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Un héros très discret, Le Promeneur du Champ-de-Mars, Indigènes and Diplomatie

reconstruct one's own identity in order to gain influence, as well as to avoid responsibilities, is at the core of Albert Dehousse's story. Played by Mathieu Kassovitz, Albert is a character Sophie Grassin ( 1996 ) has described as coming from real life, from the likes of Papon and Bousquet. Grassin also argued that the film takes place during ‘une époque qui veut croire au mensonge pour mieux se reconstruire’ (a period which wanted to believe in lies in order to rebuild itself), following a principal character who decides to transform his own identity. This man and his

in Reframing remembrance
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Guy Austin

-Marxist France of the nineties was therefore ‘characterized by the “dualization of society”: “you are either in or out ”’ (Silverman 1999 : 49, citing Michel Wievorka). In terms of cinema, the result was a focus on spatial exclusion as a metaphor for social exclusion, as in Claire Denis’s J’ai pas sommeil (1993, see chapter 4 ) or Mathieu Kassovitz’s La Haine (1995, see chapter 9

in Contemporary French cinema
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Guy Austin

whose touristic value is emphasised repeatedly. Throughout the narrative Amélie acts out her childlike fantasies of omnipotence and of belonging: she manipulates the lives of her neighbours and colleagues, whose idiosyncrasies are detailed in the persistent and rather cloying voice-over. Intrigued by Nino (Mathieu Kassovitz), a young man who seems as shy and solitary as herself, she prepares a laborious treasure hunt for him

in Contemporary French cinema
Guy Austin

popular cinema, Manchester, Manchester University Press. Higbee, W. (2005) , The return of the political, or designer visions of exclusion? The case for Mathieu Kassovitz’s fracture sociale trilogy, Studies in French Cinema , 5:2, 123–35 . Jeancolas, J-P. (2005), The confused image of le jeune cinéma, Studies in French Cinema, 5:3, 157

in Contemporary French cinema
Islam and the contestation of citizenship
Shailja Sharma

the police, in round-ups (rodéos) that end in predictable tragedy for the book’s protagonists. Charef’s early Beur novel, however, does point out the “in-between” status of children like Majid, who are neither French nor Algerian. It makes a strong connection between social and economic exclusion and urban violence. The 1995 fiction film La Haine, presented in a documentary style by director Mathieu Kassovitz, makes a similar point by following a day in the lives of Saïd, Vincent and Hubert, three young residents of a dilapidated housing project outside Paris. Saïd

in Postcolonial minorities in Britain and France
The backlash against multiculturalism
Shailja Sharma

banlieues, a group that added young Algerians fleeing the civil war in Algeria to the mix in the banlieues. Silverstein sees in this new generation as the dystopian counterparts of their utopian predecessors, substituting a culture of hate and rioting for organization and marches. They created a an inward-looking culture of neighbourhood gangs, rodéos and daily violence. Mathieu Kassovitz’s film La Haine (1995) portrays the anger and sense of abandonment that minority youth in the cités felt. At this time a transnational filiation with Islamic and Algerian groups also

in Postcolonial minorities in Britain and France