Search results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 240 items for :

  • "Terrorism" x
  • International Relations x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Richard Jackson

There is little doubt that terrorism is now considered the greatest danger to western security since the threat of superpower confrontation at the height of the cold war. In May 2003 the G 8 Summit affirmed that terrorism remains a ‘pervasive and global threat’ (Pfaff 2003 ); more recently Eliza Manningham-Buller, the Director-General of MI5 stated that a

in Writing the war on terrorism
Meeting the challenge of internal security
Emil Kirchner and James Sperling

‘securitisation’ of societal vulnerabilities has been matched by a relative ‘desecuritisation’ of the state’s traditional security role; viz., the defence of national territory from external attack. 1 Changes in technology, the consolidation and spread of transnational criminal organisations, and Muslim terrorism have accelerated this securitisation process. The fear of Muslim

in EU security governance
Phil Williams

2504Chap4 7/4/03 12:39 pm Page 69 4 Eurasia and the transnational terrorist threats to Atlantic security Phil Williams The terrorist attacks of September 11 on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were not only the most audacious and successful terrorist attacks the world has yet seen, but also marked the maturation of what had been described as the ‘new terrorism’. It was a maturation in several senses. In the first place it revealed that trends identified by astute specialists such as Walter Laqueur, Bruce Hoffman and Ian Lesser were, in fact, well

in Limiting institutions?
Anti-terrorism powers and vernacular (in)securities
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

The two preceding chapters focused on public understandings of anti-terrorism policy and the implications of these for the status and practice of citizenship. As we saw, and perhaps as we might expect, there is no unidirectional relationship between these entities. While many people in the UK feel that their experience of citizenship has been adversely affected by developments

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Abstract only
Evil terrorists, good Americans
Richard Jackson

ONE OF THE MOST NOTICEABLE and ubiquitous features of the language of counter-terrorism is its invariable appeal to identity: terrorists are endlessly demonised and vilified as being evil, barbaric and inhuman, while America and its coalition partners are described as heroic, decent and peaceful – the defenders of freedom. The clear implication of this language is

in Writing the war on terrorism
Abstract only
Tim Aistrope

THIS CHAPTER SHIFTS THE focus from foreign policy commentary to War on Terror doctrine. It does so by engaging with the Bush administration’s War of Ideas strategy, which aimed to undermine the cultural drivers of terrorism by winning the ‘hearts and minds’ of Arab-Muslims thought vulnerable to radicalisation. The strategic significance of this

in Conspiracy theory and American foreign policy
Abstract only
Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz, and Julian Cooper

Bacon 08 3/2/06 10:37 AM Page 177 8 Conclusion Throughout this book we have analysed a number of different aspects of Russia today through the prism of security. Using the securitisation approach developed in the sphere of international relations1 we have considered contemporary Russian domestic policies in relation to Chechen separatism, the media, terrorism, religion, political parties, nationalism, migration, and the economy. Although there are of course connections between these policy areas – some more so than others – each chapter can be read on its

in Securitising Russia
Richard Jackson

narratives could have been chosen which would have given the events quite a different ‘reading’. Most importantly, the narrative worked to justify and normalise the military response at the heart of the ‘war on terrorism’. There are four notable features of the language I wish to examine here. First, and unsurprisingly, the attacks are discursively constructed as an exceptional tragedy and a grievous harm. In

in Writing the war on terrorism
The view from New Delhi
Rajesh Rajagopalan

of terrorism as state strategy, but little beyond. In addition, there are also some common worries about Pakistan’s dependence on tactical nuclear weapons (TNWs) and early nuclear escalation strategy. But it is unclear that these can lead to any viable cooperation between the two sides. Current state of cooperation on nuclear stability There has been only quite minor cooperation between the U.S. and India on enhancing nuclear stability, primarily having to do with nuclear security, and even this has

in The future of U.S.–India security cooperation
Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz, and Julian Cooper

when talking to audiences in Russia about policy in Chechnya since late 2000. At the same time, domestic audiences have also been told that the threat from terrorism is sufficiently great that a range of measures in other policy areas result from the situation in Chechnya, and international criticism of Russian actions in the republic has been countered by the insistence that the Chechen conflict is a key part of the war against terrorism. Both of these stances undermine the conflicting discourse that life in Chechnya is returning to normal. From the point of view of

in Securitising Russia