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Eric Klingelhofer

Mary’s, Maryland, 2001); compare with H. C. Forman, Jamestown and St Mary’s: Buried Cities of Romance (Baltimore, 1938). 8 See H. M Colvin, J. Summerson, M. Biddle, J. R. Hale, and M. Merriman, The History of the King’s Works, Vol. IV 1485–1660 (Part II) , (London, 1982). 9 H. M. Colvin, D. R. Ransome, and J. Summerson, The History of the King’s Works, Vol. IV 1485–1660 (Part I) , (London, 1975), pp. 373–5. 10 Described by S. G. Ellis, Tudor Ireland: Crown, Community and Conflict of

in Castles and Colonists
Brian Mac Cuarta

in early seventeenth-century Ireland are outlined in P. Corish, The Catholic Community in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (Dublin, 1981), pp. 18–42. 3 On the ecclesiastical situation of mid-sixteenth-century Ulster, see Henry Jefferies, Priests and Prelates of Armagh in the Age of Reformations, 1518–1558 (Dublin, 1997); the expansion of crown influence in Ulster in the late sixteenth century is treated in H. Morgan, Tyrone’s Rebellion: The Outbreak of the Nine Years War in Tudor Ireland (Woodbridge, 1993); on ecclesiastical decline by the early

in The plantation of Ulster
Ian Campbell

transformed by later lawyers into the patriotic boast that the common law was, as Darcy put it, ‘the best human law’, the most just 72 Ibid., pp. 103–4, 203, 282. I have adjusted the punctuation of the quotation. 73 Ibid. p. 203. 74 Ciaran Brady, ‘The road to the View: on the decline of reform thought in Tudor Ireland’, in Patricia Coughlin (ed.), Spenser and Ireland: An Interdisciplinary Perspective (Cork, 1989), pp. 25–45, at 30–1; Patrick Darcy, ‘An argument’, ed. C. E. J. Caldicott, Camden Miscellany, 31 (1992), 191–320, at 271. 75 Sir John Fortescue, A Learned

in Renaissance humanism and ethnicity before race
Ian Campbell

administrationis aut politiae forma illustrior aut praestantior aut Hiberniae accommodatior excogitari potest, quam ea qua Anglia ad summam perfectionem eximiamque felicitatem adducta est atque evecta’, Herbert, Croftus, pp. 70–1. 51 Ciaran Brady, ‘The Road to the View: on the decline of reform thought in Tudor Ireland’, in Patricia Coughlan (ed.), Spenser and Ireland: An Interdisciplinary Perspective (Cork, 1989), pp. 25–45. 66 ሉ Renaissance humanism ሊ The threat of natural slavery While insisting that the Gaelic Irish were barbarians whose way of life needed to be reformed

in Renaissance humanism and ethnicity before race
Abstract only
Derricke, Dürer, and Foxe
Thomas Herron

. 72). 39 Stuart Kinsella, ‘Colonial Commemoration in Tudor Ireland: The Case of Sir Henry Sidney’. Sidney Journal 29:1–2 (2011), pp. 103–39, at pp. 125–7. According to Ciaran Brady and James Murray, Sidney ‘was determined to see the repair of church fabric and drafted legislation [in 1569] to ensure that both clergy and laity assumed their responsibility in this regard’. This was but one element of a ‘coherent reformation strategy’. Brady and Murray, ‘Sir Henry Sidney and

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Stuart Kinsella

of Public Worship in the Sixteenth Century’, in Herron and Potterton (ed.), Dublin and the Pale in the Renaissance , pp. 182–206, at p. 200 and Stuart Kinsella, ‘Colonial Commemoration in Tudor Ireland: The Case of Sir Henry Sidney’, Sidney Journal 29:1–2 (2011), pp. 103–41, at p. 136. See also Edmund Curtis, ‘Extracts out of Heralds’ Books in Trinity College, Dublin, Relating to Ireland in the 16th Century’, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 62 (1932), pp. 28–49, at p. 44

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Political networks
Gemma Allen

, Ireland, 1509–1573, ed. H.C. Hamilton (1860), pp. 401, 421, 422, 464. 48 CP 157, fo. 15r: 26/10/1569. 49 See, for example, Bodl., Carte MS LVIII, fo. 664r: 29/08/1568. 50 NA, SP 63/22, fo. 62r: 24/11/1567; SP 63/23, fos 44r–v: 22/01/1568. 51 SP 63/23, fo. 48v: 22/01/1568. 52 Bodl., Carte MS LVIII, fo. 218r: 20/01/1568. 53 NA, SP 63/23, fo. 49r. 54 Bodl., Carte MS LVIII, fo. 664r: 29/08/1568. 55 Ibid., fo. 218r. For the alliances between the Ulster lords, see C. Brady, The Chief Governors: The Rise and Fall of Reform Government in Tudor Ireland, 1536

in The Cooke sisters
Abstract only
Mills and acts
Coleman A. Dennehy

Ireland (Dublin, 1938), pp. 292–325; ‘Richard duke of York as viceroy of Ireland, 1447–1460’, JRSAI , 62 (1932), pp. 158–86. 37 32 Henry VI, c. 6. For recent work on this declaration, see A. Cosgrove, ‘Parliament and the Anglo-Irish community: the declaration of 1460’ in A. Cosgrove, A. and J.I. McGuire (eds), Parliament and community: historical studies XIV (Belfast, 1983); J.F. Lydon, ‘Ireland corporate of itself: The parliament of 1460’, History Ireland , 3 (1995), pp. 9–12; S.G. Ellis, ‘Parliament and community in Yorkist and Tudor Ireland’ in Cosgrove and

in The Irish Parliament, 1613–89
Coleman A. Dennehy

Ireland, 1290–1324 (Cambridge, 1967); J. Otway-Ruthven, A history of medieval Ireland (London, 1980); Richardson and Sayles, The administration of Ireland . 139 Hart, ‘The king’s serjeants at law in Ireland: a short history’ in Osborough (ed.), Explorations in law and history , p. 52; A history of the king’s serjeants at law (Dublin, 2000); ‘The king’s serjeants at law in Tudor Ireland, 1485–1603’ in D. Hogan and W.N. Osborough (eds), Brehons, serjeants and attorneys: studies in the Irish legal profession (Dublin, 1990); Richardson and Sayles, The Irish

in The Irish Parliament, 1613–89