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Andreas Antoniades

power’.15 Following this logic the KKE adopted an explicitly supportive stance towards the anti-globalisation movement (including its radical expressions). For instance, after the protests in Goteborg, in 2001, the central committee of KKE criticised Simitis for supporting ‘state violence’ that had led to ‘hundreds of prosecutions and . . . one clinically dead protester’.16 Moreover, according to the central committee, these developments demanded ‘an equally strong response to be given to the imperialist barbarism’. The announcement concluded that ‘[t]he struggle

in Producing globalisation
Andreas Antoniades

flexibility and mobile capital investments were considered to be prime policy targets and positive achievements. Thus Fianna Fáil emphatically argued for, and tried to achieve what the anti-globalisation movement had as its focal points of criticism (flexibility and mobile capital investments). At the same time the proposed (economic) policies were considered as manifestations of a new approach to economic development, the ‘Irish economic model’. ‘Our policy is to further develop the Irish economic model, combining . . . our own experience, with the dynamism, investment and

in Producing globalisation
Abstract only
Kimberly Hutchings

certain populations against the full consequences of global imperial power. This breakdown is a stage on the way to a different kind of change, in which ‘the multitude’ directly confronts empire. Exemplary cases of the latter kind of revolutionary practice on Hardt and Negri’s account include anti-globalisation politics and indigenous revolutionary movements (2000: 53–54, 393–413; 2005: 264–267, 299–303). We need to look now from the other side and recognize the logic that determines the genealogy of forms of insurgency and revolt. This logic and this trajectory will

in Time and world politics
Roger Mac Ginty and Paula Banerjee

mobility. These are classic social justice issues. It would be incorrect to say that these issues are nonpolitical: all issues connected with how states and societies distribute resources are political. However, the issues connected with the Arab uprisings were not necessarily connected with overtly political issues such as nationalism, identity or sect. A similar critique can be made about many of the Occupy protests that arose from the near collapse of global capitalism after 2008 (and indeed the anti-globalisation movement before that).19 Many of these movements had

in Cultures of governance and peace
Sources of anti-Americanism
Mitchell B. Reiss

’s currency of choice and the US market is the world’s largest, richest and most open. For all of these reasons, anti-globalisation efforts single out the United States; anti-globalisation protests are often indistinguishable from anti-American rants. Sixth and finally, there is a global demographic shift taking place. The post-war generation in Europe, Korea, Japan and Australia is leaving centre stage. The impact of the passing of the generational torch cannot be underestimated. Previously, governing elites in Western Europe and the United States all shared the historical

in Peacemaking in the twenty-first century
Open Access (free)
Louise Amoore

the globalisation process, removing the messiness of politics and leaving only the ‘right and necessary’ policy measures. As the millennium turned, the picture began to change so that we now begin to see partial glimpses of the push and shove of a social and political contestation that was, in truth, always present. Now we see the news media popularising debates about the power of multinational corporations (MNCs), the plight of the global economy’s ‘new slaves’ and the ‘anti-globalisation’ protests (Klein, 2000; Bales, 1999; British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC

in Globalisation contested
Antigoni Memou

9 Joel Sternfeld’s anti-photojournalistic images of Genoa J o e l Sternfeld’s Treading on Kings: Protesting the G8 in Genoa is a series of twenty-seven formal portraits, which form the basic body of a book, published on the occasion of an exhibition of Sternfeld’s project at the White Box Gallery in New York.1 The photographs were taken during the anti-globalisation protests in Genoa in 2001, and document the diversity of participants in the transnational movement against neoliberal globalisation. The movement, which took to the streets in Seattle, Prague

in Photography and social movements
Abstract only
Reflections on the work of Norman Geras
Terry Glavin

, in the humanities and social sciences, and in nearly all the places where the left used to be, progressive internationalism had been supplanted by crude forms of anti-globalisation – almost exclusively anti-Americanism, anti-Zionism and Third Worldism. Left-wing politics had been largely uprooted from conventional class politics. Postmodernist theory and the tropes of the counter-culture had come to stand in for socialism. Radical analysis had given way to the radical-chic. And suddenly, here was a big-screen spectacle, a vividly horrific mass atrocity carried out

in The Norman Geras Reader
Abstract only
Scott Hamilton

continually impressed by the relevance of his preoccupations to our own age. When I read Thompson’s denunciations of the impact of right-wing ‘modernisation theory’ on the Third World in the 1960s and 1970s, I thought about the contemporary anti-globalisation movement’s 3 Introduction complaints against the ideology of bodies like the International Monetary Fund. When I found Thompson decrying the attacks on the jury system of 1970s British governments, I knew what he would make of the curtailing of civil liberties in his homeland during the age of the ‘War on Terror

in The crisis of theory
Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Louise Amoore

working practices. There are predominantly two aspects that come out of my analysis: one is the sketching of a potential political terrain in spaces where work takes place, the other concerns the implications of an IPE of social practice for other spheres of social activity. Seizing the political ground in the contemporary globalisation debate has tended to imply a direct resistance, exemplified by the so-called anti-globalisation campaigns. Yet, it is interesting that these resistance groups tend to be depicted as united ‘against’ a single foe, despite the manifest

in Globalisation contested