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Peter Hutchings

David Pirie concluded his 1973 study of British horror cinema with an optimistic call for a regeneration of the genre: ‘On present reckoning at least (although it is much too early to say with any certainty), the gothic cinematic revival in England looks like having a more lasting popular success than the original literary movement from which it derives.’ 1 Unfortunately, Pirie’s optimism was misplaced. British horror as a distinct category of a national cinema was not to survive the

in Hammer and beyond
Gothic aesthetics and feminine identification in the filmic adaptations of Clive Barker
Brigid Cherry

aesthetics do arise, but in the context of Barker's status within the fan canon, and especially amongst female fans, how might responses in the chosen audience to his films aid our understanding of the aesthetic pleasures of horror cinema? Furthermore, in considering the female audience specifically, what is it about films adapted from his work in particular that hold such strong

in Clive Barker
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Michael Goodrum and Philip Smith

direct response to the crippled and mutilated veterans who returned from the First World War.23 These images of disfigured bodies also found a home in cinema in the form of the rat-like vampire in Nosferatu and the autonomous hand in Orlacs Hände. European horror cinema, then, offered a window into the cultural unconscious after the First World War. American filmmakers found themselves scrambling to catch up. The earliest film interventions in horror came from Universal Studios, which began production of what is now known as the Universal Monsters series of films in

in Printing terror
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Linnie Blake

deployed by American film makers to explore and revise ideas of national identity in the light of the traumatic events of the recent past. From the 1960s onwards, in response to the Vietnam War, the 126 From Vietnam to 9/11 generational, ethnic and regional conflict engendered by the imposition of Civil Rights in the South and the rise of the counterculture across the United States, a new kind of horror cinema, exclusively located in the backwoods of the American psyche had emerged as films such as John Boorman’s Deliverance (1972), Tobe Hooper’s The Texas Chainsaw

in The wounds of nations
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Peter Hutchings

, uses the study of directors as one way of exploring particular areas of British cinema. 1 Both of these functions are readily apparent, for instance, in David Pirie’s A Heritage of Horror: The English Gothic Cinema 1946–1972 which intertwines an evaluation of Fisher as auteur (along with some other director studies) with a more general account of British horror cinema. Fisher himself emerges from this as a film-maker who

in Terence Fisher
The heritage of horror on British television
Helen Wheatley

portmanteau format from this studio in the late 1960s and early 1970s, whereby three or four short stories were grouped together within a single film, framed by frequently implausible devices for storytelling established at the start of each film, might in fact be seen as British horror cinema referencing television’s anthology format. Peter Hutchings ( 2002b ) offers a thorough account of the origins of the

in Gothic television
Ruth Barton

Until the late 1990s, no recognisable Irish horror cinema existed. Since then, it has become one of the most prolific genres of contemporary Irish filmmaking, and, in keeping with generic precedent, the one most likely to disturb the boundaries of self and Other, geography, gender and race. The selection of films discussed in this chapter range from conventional Gothic horror to exploitation cinema, to ‘revenge of nature’ horror, to high-school zombie-comedies and other parodies. There is even an Irish-language horror television film, Na Cloigne

in Irish cinema in the twenty-first century
Valentina Vitali

4 The Hindi horror films of the Ramsay brothers In Shaitani ilaaka / Satan’s Circle (Kiran Ramsay, 1990) we are presented with the murder of a man at the hands of a shape-shifting female. The barely dressed woman walks into a room where a man is lying on a bed. The camera, initially positioned behind and at a short distance from the woman, slowly tracks in to take up her point of view. She hypnotises him, has sex with him and finally kills him. We witness these actions as if through the woman’s eyes. This sequence is typical of Hindi horror cinema, which perhaps

in Capital and popular cinema
Peter Hutchings

Originally published in Steve Chibnall and Julian Petley (eds), British Horror Cinema (London: Routledge, 2002), 131–44. There comes a moment in the British horror film Tales from the Crypt (Freddie Francis, 1972) when a Christmas carol radio broadcast is broken into by the following words: ‘We interrupt this programme for a special announcement. A man described as a homicidal maniac has escaped from the hospital for the criminally insane … and may be wearing a Santa Claus

in Hammer and beyond
George A. Romero’s horror of the 1970s
Linnie Blake

threat but by the nation’s failure to live up to its originary promise and by its leaders’ subsequent refusal to look upon the psycho-social wounds inflicted upon the people by that failure. Romero does not simply depict the traumatic ramifications of historic events, as a number of critics have observed, but undertakes a highly self-conscious George A. Romero’s horror of the 1970s 81 exploration as to the ways in which the generic conventions of horror cinema might expose the ways in which dominant ideologies of nationhood work as a means of repressing that trauma

in The wounds of nations