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Authenticity
Steven Earnshaw

of existence: the novel is both a direct attack on 1950s America and a metaphysical account of how an individual strives to ‘exist’ in a world in which he is alienated. His inability to consummate his relationship with Bunny Sue is also shown as his inability to connect with his country: ‘I went back to Chicago and replayed the memory of it; it was that day I first sensed that I had never loved Bunny Sue –​I could not even put her features together –​and that my inability to couple had not been with her but with some aspect of America with which I could not have

in The Existential drinker
Self and others
Steven Earnshaw

affectionately (the diminutive as pet name), but also in some way as ‘reduced’ (the author’s alter ego, but with less substance).39 A BBC programme on Yerofeev recorded by Pawel Pawlikowski40 shortly before Yerofeev died introduces some of the originals for the characters in the novel, including one drunk who recalls a form of literary duelling with Yerofeev and others, in which the participants challenged each other as to who could best recite literature from memory. In the programme Yerofeev has to use a voice box in order to speak, following surgery for throat cancer. The

in The Existential drinker
Philip Nanton

between the years 1900 and 1934 that some twenty-four were labourers, one a small proprietor, one a woodcutter; eleven other leaders had no identifiable occupation (Cox, 1993 : 14). 5 Patricia Stephens describes the pattern of these links as ‘a broken continuum, one which relied on ancestral memory, something disjointed … a wound

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Abstract only
Helena de Bres

gesticulating, while the bright fire of rational argument beamed from his chest like a searchlight sweeping the dark, unsettled sea before him.
 My memory of the details is fuzzy, but our first class no doubt tracked the standard intro to the subject, which runs like this:
 “Most of us go about our lives assuming we have a significant degree of control over our values, choices, and actions,” the professor begins. “Sure, we may run up against some everyday impediments—say, our micromanaging boss, our

in How to Be Multiple
Sabotage as a citizenship enactment at the fringes
,

migrated from one postsocialist EU Member State to another. Whilst she managed to secure formal employment later in life, as a schoolchild she was allocated to a Roma-only class. Teša described her memory of her schooling: I remember the time when we moved from the old school to the new one. There Roma had a separate entrance and there were even separate bathrooms for showering in the gym locker room. They did not see me as others and they told me I could use the gym locker room of non-Roma. But I

in The Fringes of Citizenship
Stephen Hobden

there, questions of accuracy arise. To what extent are these records reliable? If memories, can they be trusted? When we draw on history books, we become more distanced from events. Why has the historian chosen this bit of information rather than another? What is their motivation for telling this story, in this way, drawing on these pieces of information? Also, when we discuss these events with students, we are adding another layer of separation. At a more abstract level, why are particular events deemed to be more important or significant than others, and who gets to

in Critical theory and international relations
Fichte, Hölderlin and Novalis
Andrew Bowie

memory or for decision preceding an action – ‘go back into itself ’, and thus have a ‘being for itself (1971 I pp. 458–9): ‘I and activity which returns into itself are completely identical concepts’ (1971 I p. 462). As Fichte suggests (and the adherents of the myth of artificial intelligence would do well to listen): 74 Aesthetics and subjectivity ‘The mechanism cannot grasp itself, precisely because it is a mechanism. Only free consciousness can grasp itself ’ (1971 I p. 510). This grasping of itself cannot be the result of anything which determines the I to grasp

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Open Access (free)
Art as the ‘organ of philosophy’
Andrew Bowie

, like existence in general, is only to be grasped as the memory of a dark, never fully recoverable basis’ (ed. Frank and Kurz 1975 p. 41). This conception does not, however, make Schelling an irrationalist: ‘Schelling’s concept of reason is enlightened about itself. Reason is not the Other of nature, it is its – undeveloped – part’ (p. 42). His essential argument can be interpreted as establishing a link between Fichte’s notion of the ‘thetic judgement’, in which ‘the place of the predicate is left empty to infinity for the possible determination of the I’, and the

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Abstract only
Allyn Fives

, ‘only that it is entirely nonutopian. In that respect it may well be what Emerson called a party of memory rather than a party of hope’ (Shklar 1989a , p. 26). Shklar's affinity for Emerson is an important factor here. It is evident when she talks about the way Emerson sought to combine scepticism with a commitment to democracy. As a democrat, he ‘may have to give up utopian enterprises […] The pursuit of the perfect city is an insult to the actual town’ (Shklar 1998 [1990c] , p. 61). As democrats, we should ‘look at the reform of other people from their point of

in Judith Shklar and the liberalism of fear
Abstract only
Avoiding the ‘big hole with a lot of dead people in it’
Stephen Hobden

– with the stress on ‘slightly’. In the essay ‘Progress’ he points towards the emergence of a collective at the species level (Adorno, 1998c : 144). However, he also had a concern about the possibilities of collective action, which always, for Adorno, raised memories of Nazi Germany and Stalinism. Important in considering action was the responsibility of the individual to consider their situation. Also, significantly, in a world where there was a danger of ‘actionism’ – the perhaps understandable desire to ‘do something’ when confronted with a deeply unjust world, but

in Critical theory and international relations